Past Services

Below is a full-content listing of service music from May 2017 to present, with links to leaflets, live streams, and podcasts. Your browser search function is helpful in locating particular dates or content. Music archives from 2010 to mid-2017 are found here. Upcoming service listings are found here.

May 19, 2019 + The Fifth Sunday of Easter: Youth Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth Choir, sermon by graduating seniors.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     Steal away     African-American spiritual, arr. Hal Hopson, 2012
Britt Emerick, viola

Processional Hymn 477    All praise to thee, for thou, O King divine    Engelberg

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle

Sequence Hymn 487    Come, my Way, my Truth, my Life     The Call

Offertory Anthem    I will worship    George Dyson (1883-1964)
Text from Psalm 138

I will worship toward thy holy temple and praise thy name for thy loving kindness and truth.
All the earth shall praise thee, they shall sing in the ways of the Lord, that great is the glory of the Lord.
For though the Lord is high yet hath respect unto the lowly;
Though I walk in the midst of trouble, yet thou shall refresh me and thy right hand shall hold me.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem    Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem      Nunc dimittis in D     Herbert Sumsion (1899-1995)

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace according to thy word.
For mine eyes have seen thy salvation,
Which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;
To be a light to lighten the Gentiles and to be the glory of thy people Israel.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be. World without end, amen.

Hymn in Procession 544    Jesus shall reign where’er the sun    Duke Street

Voluntary    Toccata Brevis    Daniel Gawthrop (b. 1949)

May 12, 2019 + The Fourth Sunday of Easter: Good Shepherd Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     Sheep may safely Graze    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

In addition to his 199 surviving sacred cantatas, Bach composed several secular cantatas for various occasions. Cantata 208, the “Hunting Cantata,” was written in 1716 for the birthday of Duke Christian of Saxe-Weissenfels and was performed as banquet music in his hunting lodge after a hunt. This well-known soprano aria text is: “Flocks and herds may safely pasture when their shepherd guards them well. They whose monarch loves them truly knows their needs and fills them duly, will in peace and concord dwell.” This organ arrangement is by E. Power Biggs.

Processional Hymn 366    Holy God we praise thy Name    Grosser Gott

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle

Sequence Hymn 646    The King of love my Shepherd is    Dominus regit me

Offertory Anthem    The Lord is my shepherd     Thomas Matthews (1915-1999)
Words: Psalm 23

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem    Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem      The Lord is my shepherd    Iona Chant, arr. John Bell (b. 1949)
Text: Psalm 23
Claudia Ayer and Erica Maas, soloists

Hymn in Procession 522    Glorious things of thee are spoken    Austria

Voluntary    Grand Choeur on Austria    Richard Purvis (1917-1992)

From 1947 through 1971, Richard Purvis held the position of Organist and Master of Choristers at Grace Cathedral, where he helped to form a cathedral school for boys. Upon his retirement from Grace Cathedral, he continued to compose, teach and give recitals into his 70’s. He died on December 25, 1994 at the age of 81. He left a legacy of over 200 works and an uncounted number of choristers, students and satisfied listeners. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and his 7 Choral Preludes, including this work, were composed while he was in a foxhole under enemy fire.

May 5, 2019 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

May 5, 2019 + The Third Sunday of Easter

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Trumpet Voluntary    Henry Heron (1738-1795)
Gymnopedie No. 1     Eric Satie (1866-1925), arr. for organ by Ted Babbitt

Processional Hymn 205    Good Christians all, rejoice and sing    Gelobt sei Gott

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle

Sequence Hymn 256    A light from heaven shone around    Cornish

Offertory Anthem   The stone is rolled away    Victor C. Johnson (b. 1978)

The stone is rolled away, hallelujah! The Lord is risen from the grave, the stone is rolled away.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem    Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Motet    Ubi caritas    Ola Gjeilo (b. 1978)
Words from the Maundy Thursday liturgy

Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Congregavit nos in unum Christi amor.
Exsultemus, et in ipso jucundemur. Timeamus, et amemus Deum vivum.
Et ex corde diligamus nos sincero.
Where charity and love are, God is there. Christ’s love has gathered us into one.
Let us rejoice and be pleased in him. Let us fear, and let us love the living God.
And may we love each other with a sincere heart.

Ola Gjeilo writes: The first time I sang in a choir was in high school; I went to a music high school in Norway and choir was obligatory. I loved it from the very first rehearsal, and the first piece we read through was Maurice Duruflé’s Ubi Caritas. It will always be one of my favorite choral works of all time; to me, it’s the perfect a cappella piece. ​So when I set the same text myself a few years later, it was inevitable that the Duruflé would influence it, and it did. While Duruflé used an existing, traditional chant in his piece, I used chant more as a general inspiration, while also echoing the form and dynamic range of his incomparable setting of the text.

Hymn in Procession 535    Ye servants of God, your Master proclaim    Paderborn

Voluntary     Jerusalem      C. Hubert H. Parry (1848-1918)

Today’s closing voluntary celebrates four years of the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton’s ministry with us. Far from just an Anglophilic anthem, Hubert Parry’s Jerusalem is a powerful and dramatic musical setting of the poem with the same title by William Blake that imagines a visit to England by Christ himself during a time of great strife and tumult.

April 28, 2019 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the Men and Boys of Trinity Church, New Haven.

Click here for details.

April 28, 2019 + The Second Sunday of Easter

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. with Easter Lessons and Carols.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Choral from Pièces en style libre   Louis Vierne (1870-1937)

Processional Hymn 208    Alleluia! The strife is o’er    Victory

Lessons and Carols for Easter

In the same tradition that we employ in Advent and Christmas, the story of Easter is illuminated through meaningful scripture readings punctuated by song. This liturgy is shared without commentary, allowing the meaning of the words and music to dwell in your heart and find their own personal meaning. Please join in singing as indicated.

Jeremiah 31: 1-6 – God’s everlasting love is proclaimed to his people
Hymn 458, vv 1, 2, 7   My song is love unknown    Love unknown
Isaiah 52:7-10, 13-15 – The prophet foretells the coming of the Savior
Hymn 178, vv. 1, 2, 4    Alleluia, Alleluia, give thanks to the risen Lord   Alleluia No. 1
Revelation 21:1-7 – Saint John speaks of the New Jerusalem
Hymn 182, vv. 1, 2, 5     Christ is alive!    Truro
Luke 24:1-9 – The women find the empty tomb
Sequence Hymn 204    Now the green blade riseth   Noël nouvelet
John 20:19-31 – Jesus reveals himself to the disciples and to Thomas
Hymn 206    O sons and daughters, let us sing    O filii, O filiae

Offertory Music  Préambule from Pièces en style libre   Louis Vierne

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem    Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Closing Hymn 180   He is risen, he is risen!   Unser Herrscher

Voluntary  Carillon de Longpont from Pièces en style libre  Louis Vierne

April 21, 2019 + The Sunday of the Resurrection: Easter Day

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs with brass and timpani, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Carillon de Westminster    Louis Vierne (1870-1937)
(10:30 only) Louis Vierne was organist of Notre-Dame-de-Paris from 1900 until his death while playing a recital in 1937. He was teacher to Marcel Dupré, who eventually taught St. John’s longtime organist Clarence Watters. This voluntary is presented as a prayer for Paris, and for people around the world who find solace and peace in God-given houses of worship.

Introit    Easter people, raise your voices!    Scott Lamlein, 2014
Words: William M. James (1913-2013)

Easter people, raise your voices, sounds of heaven in earth should ring.
Christ has brought us heaven’s choices; heavenly music, let it ring.
Alleluia! Alleluia! Easter people, let us sing.

Processional Hymn 175   Hail thee, festival day!    Salve festa dies
At 8:30, verses 1-4 will be sung.

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle
(10:30 only)

Sequence Hymn 199   Come, ye faithful, raise the strain     St. Kevin

Offertory Anthem    Christ the Lord hath triumphed over death    Raymond Weidner (b. 1947)

Christ the Lord has triumphed over death. Alleluia!
The bonds of sin no longer hold us captive. Alleluia!
Therefore, let us live anew: rejecting sin and being perfected by the Holy Spirit
as new
 creations through our Lord and Savior.
Glory be to him who sets the captive free, and sits upon his heavenly throne forever! Alleluia! 

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem    Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem     Alleluia    Randall Thompson (1899-1984)

Communion Hymn 305   Come, risen Lord   Rosedale

Closing Hymn 207    Jesus Christ is risen today   Easter Hymn

Voluntary    Toccata (Symphonie V)    Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)

Music: The St. John’s Adult Choir (8:00), The Saint John’s Youth and Adult Choirs (10:30)
Organist/Choirmaster: Scott Lamlein
Assisting Organist/Choirmaster: David Chrzanowski
Organ Scholar: Ted Babbitt
Trumpeters: Tom Hintz, Jeff Higgins
Timpani: Kuljit Rehncy

April 19, 2019 + Good Friday

Good Friday Liturgies:
12 noon at St. John’s with hymns;
7:00 p.m. at St. James’s, sung by the combined choirs.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Organ Voluntary (noon)    As Jesus hung upon the cross    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Hymns (noon):

167   There is a green hill far away   Horsley

458   My song is love unknown    Love unknown

172   Were you there when they crucified my Lord    Were You There

Anthems (7:00 p.m. at St. James’s)

No more sorrow   Will Todd (b. 1970)
Text from Revelation 21

And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes;
And there shall be no more death,
Neither sorrow nor crying,
Neither any more pain,
For the former things are passed away.

Final chorus from the cantata O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden
(O sacred head sore wounded)     Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

April 18, 2019 + Maundy Thursday

Holy Eucharist Rite II and Footwashing at 7:00 p.m. sung by the Youth Choir, sermon by Mike Corey.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Priere à Notre-Dame    Léon Boëllmann (1862-1897)

Kyrie Eleison S-84   Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 325   Let us break bread together on our knees    Let us break bread

Song at the Maundy    Stay with me     Stay with me

Offertory Anthem    When Jesus wept    William Billings (1746-1800)

When Jesus wept, the falling tear
In mercy flowed beyond all bound;
When Jesus groaned, a trembling fear
Seized all the guilty world around.

Sanctus    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Agnus Dei    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Hymn 315    Thou, who at thy first Eucharist didst pray   Song 1

Psalm 22    Plainsong Chant
Britt Emerick and Claudia Ayer, soloists

April 14, 2019 + Sunday of the Passion – Palm Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Palm Procession from the Cloister Garden

Hymn in Procession 154    All glory, laud, and honor    Valet will ich dir geben

Kyrie Eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 158    Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended     Herzliebster Jesu
Sung in unison; men sing verse 2, women sing verse 3, all sing remaining verses.

Offertory Anthem      No more sorrow   Will Todd (b. 1970)
Text from Revelation 21

And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes;
And there shall be no more death,
Neither sorrow nor crying,
Neither any more pain,
For the former things are passed away.

Will Todd is a remarkable artist whose output encompasses song, opera, musical theatre, orchestral pieces, jazz works, community projects and a huge body of choral music ranging from simple anthems for church and youth choirs to complex works for professional chamber choirs. His anthem The Call of Wisdom was commissioned for the Service of Thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral, London, on the occasion of HRH Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012, which was broadcast to millions worldwide.

Sanctus    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Agnus Dei    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Motet    Crucifixus    Antonio Lotti (1667-1740)
Words from the Nicene Creed

Crucifixus etiam pro nobis; sub Pontio Pilato passus et sepultus est.
He was crucified also for us; under Pontius Pilate he suffered and was buried.

Aside from two years in Dresden producing operas, Antonio Lotti spent his entire career at St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice, first as an alto singer, then as assisting assistant organist, assistant organist, main organist, and finally music director for the final four years of his life. Bach and Handel knew his work and may have been influenced by it. His 8-part setting of this brief text is justifiably famous, for its lavish dissonances and other expressive qualities so well suited to the event described.

Hymn in Procession 168    O sacred head, sore wounded    Passion Chorale

Assisting Organist: David Chrzanowski

April 7, 2019 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

April 7, 2019 + The Fifth Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     Improvisation on Rockingham

Silent Procession

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 474    When I survey the wondrous cross    Rockingham

Offertory Anthem    Surely he hath borne our griefs    Karl Heinrich Graun (1704-1759)
Text: Isaiah 53:4

Surely, surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows.

In what is probably the best-loved Old Testament prophecy of Christ’s suffering, the prophet reveals the infamous role of the people in the unfolding drama of the Crucifixion: We were not attracted to him… We hid our faces from him… We thought him under God’s righteous judgement… We have each gone astray. It is in this context that the prophet sets the record straight. Christ is not guilty in the least: “Surely He hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows.” Then Isaiah asserts – and here we can imagine his utter astonishment – that by his scourging we are healed. Graun depicts the grief and sorrow in this text by the use of melisma (one word, many notes) on the words grief and sorrow, chromaticism (half-step movement), and dissonance. The poignant resolution at the end of the work reminds us that the scourging is not in vain. Indeed, by it we are healed.

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem    Abide with me    William Henry Monk (1823-1889), arr. Moses Hogan (1957-2003)
Text: Henry Frances Lyte (1793-1897), found at Hymn 662

The setting of this timeless hymn by Moses Hogan melds his own harmonic language with the uncomplicated melody. Hogan masterfully drafted an arrangement using contemporary harmonies and stylistic devices such as sforzandos, suspensions, and dissonance resolving to consonance that effectively keep your ear interested and your heart totally engaged.

Hymn in Procession 473    Lift high the cross    Crucifer

Voluntary    Prelude in C minor, BWV 549    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

March 31, 2019 + The Fourth Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig (O Lamb of God, innocent)    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Silent Procession

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 470    There’s a wideness in God’s mercy    Beecher

Offertory Anthem   And I saw a new heaven   Edgar L. Bainton (1880-1956)
Words: Revelation 21:1-4

And I saw a new heaven and a new earth:
For the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea,
And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven,
prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.
And I heard a great voice out of heaven, saying,
Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men,
and he will dwell with them and they shall be his people,
and God himself shall be with them and be their God.
And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes;
and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying,
neither shall there be any more pain, for the former things are passed away.

Edgar Bainton’s most iconic anthem, And I saw a new heaven, is a tone-poem of ecstatic beauty. Borne aloft by the composer’s wonderfully wrought harmonization, it brings the story of creation to its ordained climax – that ultimate moment when “the former things are passed away” – and evokes St. John’s vision of heaven, one so sublime as to ease the pain and sorrow of even the saddest heart. 

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Motet   Ave verum corpus    William Byrd (1543-1623)
Words attributed to Pope Innocent VI (d. 1362)

Ave, verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine, vere passum immolatum in Cruce pro homine,
Cujus latus perforatum unda fluxit sanguine, esto nobis praegustatum in mortis examine.

Hail, true body born of the Virgin Mary, who truly suffered, sacrificed on the Cross for man,
Whose pierced side overflowed with blood, Be for us a foretaste in the test of death.

Hymn in Procession 690    Guide me, O thou great Jehovah    Cwm Rhondda

Voluntary    Improvisation on Cwm Rhondda

Assisting Organist: Christa Rakich

March 24, 2019 + The Third Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by Paul Shaker.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    An Wasserflüssen Babylon (By the waters of Babylon), BWV 653   Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Silent Procession

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 439    What wondrous love is this    Wondrous Love

Offertory Anthem     Lux aeterna from Requiem    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Lux aeterna luceat eis, Domine, cum sanctis tuis in aeternum, quia pius es.
Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux perpetua luceat eis.

May eternal light shine on them, Lord, with your saints forever, because you are gracious.
Eternal rest grant them, O Lord, and let eternal light shine upon them.

In 1947, Maurice Duruflé was already working on a suite of pieces for organ based on the Gregorian chants for the requiem mass (the service for the dead), when he was commissioned by his publisher Durand to write a large-scale work based on those texts. The resulting Requiem, originally for orchestra and chorus, is the culmination of Duruflé’s style, mixing chant, quasi-Renaissance counterpoint, and sumptuous harmony derived from Fauré, Debussy, and Ravel. This beautiful moment of light in the mass alternates between an original tune in the organ and the chant beautifully set for the choir. Then the roles swap, as the choir sings on a single note atop the organ’s hymn-like setting of the chant melody.

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Motet   Tantum ergo sacramentum    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Words: St. Thomas Aquinas, c. 1264

Tantum ergo Sacramentum veneremur cernui:
Et antiquum documentum novo cedat ritui:
Præstet fides supplementum sensuum defectui.

Genitori, Genitoque laus et jubilatio,
Salus, honor, virtus quoque sit et benedictio:
Procedenti ab utroque compar sit laudatio. Amen.

Down in adoration falling, Lo! the sacred Host we hail,
Lo! o’er ancient forms departing newer rites of grace prevail;
Faith for all defects supplying, where the feeble senses fail.

To the Everlasting Father, and the Son Who reigns on high
With the Holy Ghost proceeding forth from Each eternally,
Be salvation, honour, blessing, might, and endless majesty. Amen.

Hymn in Procession 401    The God of Abraham Praise    Leoni

Voluntary    Improvisation on Leoni

Assisting Organist: Christa Rakich

March 17, 2019 + The Second Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Improvisation on Dunedin

Oftentimes people take on a spiritual discipline in Lent, rather than “giving something up.” Your Director of Music is embarking on a musical/spiritual discipline to further the art of improvisation – the act of making music spontaneously – through offering an improvised voluntary each week during the season. While the actual music heard is created on the spot, much preparation and study precedes it, including working through method books, listening to others’ improvisations, and working with a coach to create a growing “tool box” of musical devices. But the bigger challenge is letting go and allowing the Spirit to take control, much like life. Let’s embark on the journey together!

Silent Procession

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Psalm 27    Plainsong Chant, sung by Erica Maas and John Nowacki

Sequence Hymn 455     O Love of God, how strong and true     Dunedin

Offertory Anthem     Tu es Petra    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Words: Mathew 16:18,19

Tu es Petrus, et super hanc petram aedificabo ecclesiam meam, et portae inferi non praevalebunt adversum eam.
Et tibi dabo claves regni coelorum.
Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven.

Duruflé’s Quatre Motets sur des thèmes grégoriens, Op. 10, of 1960 are written for unaccompanied chorus and ideal companion pieces for the Requiem, which is diligently being prepared for our concert on March 23. Each motet is composed around the Gregorian chant melody associated with its individual title, the most famous of which is Ubi caritas. This third motet is a rousing statement of the Church’s foundation on the rock of Saint Peter which culminates with a dramatic crescendo to the only fortissimo dynamic of the set. 

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem    A Gaelic blessing    John Rutter (b. 1945)
Words: Ancient Gaelic rune

Deep peace of the running wave to you.
Deep peace of the flowing air to you.
Deep peace of the quiet earth to you.
Deep peace of the shining stars to you.
Deep peace of the gentle night to you.
Moon and stars pour their healing light on you.
Deep peace of Christ,
of Christ the light of the world to you.
Deep peace of Christ to you.

Hymn in Procession 688    A mighty fortress is our God    Ein feste Burg

Voluntary    Ein feste Burg    Calvin Hampton (1938-1984)

March 10, 2019 + The First Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Improvisation on St. Flavian

Oftentimes people take on a spiritual discipline in Lent, rather than “giving something up.” Your Director of Music is embarking on a musical/spiritual discipline to further the art of improvisation – the act of making music spontaneously – through offering an improvised voluntary each week during the season. While the actual music heard is created on the spot, much preparation and study precedes it, including working through method books, listening to others’ improvisations, and working with a coach to create a growing “tool box” of musical devices. But the bigger challenge is letting go and allowing the Spirit to take control, much like life. Let’s embark on the journey together!

Silent Procession

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 529    In Christ there is no East or West    McKee

Offertory Anthem     Surely he hath borne our griefs (from Messiah)      George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
Words: Isaiah 53: 4-5

Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows! He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities; the chastisement of our peace was upon him.

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Motet    Kyrie eleison (after Adagio from New World Symphony)      Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904)
Odanice Olibrice, tenor soloist

Hymn in Procession 142    Lord, who throughout these forty days    St. Flavian

Voluntary     Short Prelude and Fugue in E minor, BWV      Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

March 6, 2019 + Ash Wednesday

Holy Eucharist Rite II with Imposition of Ashes at 7:00 p.m. sung by the St. John’s Schola, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Choral Dorien    Jehan Alain (1911-1940)

Opening Hymn 143    The glory of these forty days    Erhalt uns, Herr

Offertory Anthem    Lay up for yourselves    Ned Rorem (b. 1923)
Words: Matthew 6: 20-21

Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt,
And where thieves do not break through and steal.
For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

Communion Motet   Ave verum corpus    William Byrd (1543-1623)
Words attributed to Pope Innocent VI (d. 1362)

Ave, verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine, vere passum immolatum in Cruce pro homine,
Cujus latus perforatum unda fluxit sanguine, esto nobis praegustatum in mortis examine.

Hail, true body born of the Virgin Mary, who truly suffered, sacrificed on the Cross for man,
Whose pierced side overflowed with blood, Be for us a foretaste in the test of death.

Closing Hymn 674    Forgive our sins as we forgive    Detroit

St. John’s Schola: Claudia Ayer, Anne Harney, soprano; Nancy Eaton, Nancy Skeele, alto; Scott Lamlein, Paul Smith, tenor; Martin Dodd, John Nowacki, bass

March 3, 2019 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

March 3, 2019 + The Last Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Fanfare March    Thomas Donahue, 1991
Prelude on Slane     Robert Edward Smith, 1996

Processional Hymn 137    O wondrous type! O vision fair    Wareham

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 488    Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart    Slane

Offertory Anthem   Christ whose glory fills the skies    T. Frederick H. Candlyn (1892-1964)
Words: Charles Wesley (1707-1788), found at Hymn 7

T. Fredrick H. Candlyn was a Briton who emigrated to the U.S. to undertake church music in New York, first at St. Paul’s, Albany and later at St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue. His style is in lines with the Wesley family and other very “tuneful” composers. One of his most beloved works, Christ, whose glory fills the skies uses a soaring melody for the first and final stanzas, while the second stanza is a completely different four-part texture. Text painting occurs at words such as “unaccompanied” when the organ stops playing.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet    O nata lux    Morten Lauridsen (b. 1943)

O nata lux de lumine,                              O born light of light,
Jesu redemptor saeculi,                                Jesus, redeemer of the world,
dignare clemens supplicum                         mercifully deem worth and accept
laudes preces que sumere.                           the praises and prayers of your supplicants.
Qui carne quondam contegi                        Thou who once deigned to be clothed in flesh
dignatus es pro perditis,                              for the sake of the lost ones,
Nos membra confer effici,                            Grant us to be made members
tui beati corporis.                                         of your blessed body.

Morten Lauridsen was composer-in-residence of the Los Angeles Master Chorale (1994–2001) and has been a professor of composition at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music for more than 40 years. In 2007 he received the National Medal of Arts from the President in a White House ceremony, “for his composition of radiant choral works combining musical beauty, power and spiritual depth that have thrilled audiences worldwide.”  O nata lux, a text for the Feast of the Transfiguration, is certainly no exception.

Hymn in Procession 665    All my hope on God is founded    Michael

Voluntary     Fanfare     John Cook (1918-1984)

February 24, 2019 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the Choir School of Hartford, and the Choir of Trinity Church.

Click here for details.

February 24, 2019 + The Seventh Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by Michael Corey.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Prelude on Hyfrydol    Peter Niedmann (b. 1962)

Processional Hymn 390    Praise to the Lord, the Almighty    Lobe den Herren

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Psalm 37:1-12, 41-42, chanted by the choir; Taizé Antiphon

Sequence Hymn 568    Father, all loving, who rulest in majesty   Was lebet

Offertory Anthem    Dear Lord and father of mankind     Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (1848-1918)
Words by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), found at Hymn 652

Influenced as a composer principally by Bach and Brahms, Parry evolved a powerful diatonic style which itself greatly influenced future English composers such as Elgar and Vaughan Williams. Parry joined the staff of the Royal College of Music in 1884 and was appointed its director in 1894, a post he held until his death. In 1900 he succeeded John Stainer as professor of music at Oxford University. His own full development as a composer was almost certainly hampered by the immense amount of work he took on, but his energy and charisma, not to mention his abilities as a teacher and administrator, helped establish art music at the center of English cultural life. The hymntune Repton is set in its original form in this anthem.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet   Ubi caritas    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Words from the Maundy Thursday liturgy

Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Congregavit nos in unum Christi amor.
Exsultemus, et in ipso jucundemur. Timeamus, et amemus Deum vivum.
Et ex corde diligamus nos sincero.
Where charity and love are, God is there. Christ’s love has gathered us into one.
Let us rejoice and be pleased in him. Let us fear, and let us love the living God.
And may we love each other with a sincere heart.
Ubi caritasis perhaps the best known work of french composer Maurice Duruflé, and the most moving and finely wrought harmonization of this ancient Gregorian Chant. The beautiful harmonies and repeated moment on the word “sincerity” make it a perfect reminder that God’s central message is one of love. The choir is busily preparing this composer’s Requiem for our concert on March 23rd.

Hymn in Procession 657    Love divine, all loves excelling    Hyfrydol

Voluntary    Fantasy on Lobe den Herren    Emma Lou Diemer (b. 1927)

February 17, 2019 + The Sixth Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Walter McKenney.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Aria    Flor Peeters (1903-1986)

This Aria was originated in 1943 as the slow movement of a Sonata for trumpet and piano, and it is still a permanent fixture on exam syllabuses for aspiring young trumpeters. Peeters himself arranged it for organ. The expressive melody unfolds above an accompaniment of soft repeated chords. As in so much of his finest work, there is a simplicity and sincerity in this music that speaks directly to the heart. (Notes courtesy David Gammie)

Processional Hymn  544    Jesus shall reign where’er the sun    Duke Street

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 635    If thou but trust in God to guide thee    Wer nur den lieben Gott

Offertory Anthem   The Beatitudes    Bob Chilcott, 2006
Words: Matthew 5:3-11

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.
Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.
Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.
Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Bob Chilcott has been involved with choral music all his life, first as a Chorister and then a Choral Scholar at King’s College, Cambridge. Later, he sang and composed music for 12 years with the King’s Singers. His experiences with that group, his passionate commitment to young and amateur choirs, and his profound belief that music can unite people, have inspired him both to compose full-time and, through proactive workshopping, to promote choral music worldwide.This beautiful setting of the Beatitudes from Matthew’s gospel exemplifies the composer’s skill and versatility in writing for mixed voices. He leads the choir smoothly through a range of keys and moods, from the gentle simplicity of the opening “Bless’d are the poor in spirit’ to the more dramatic and colourful ‘Bless’d are ye, when men shall revile you”.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem    O Lord, increase my faith    Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625) 

 O Lord, increase my faith.
Strengthen me and confirm me in thy true faith;
endue me with wisdom, charity, chastity and patience
in all my adversity.
Sweet Jesu, say Amen.

Hymn in Procession 296    We know that Christ is raised and dies no more    Engelberg

Voluntary    Prelude on Wer nur den lieben Gott    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Assisting Organist: Douglas Johnson

February 10, 2019 + The Fifth Sunday after Epiphany – Jazz Eucharist

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs and the Hot Cat Jazz Band, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    The Hot Cat Jazz Band
This Little Light of Mine
Amazing Grace
Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho

By now you have noticed that things are a little different this morning! Our music today is led by the Hot Cat Jazz Band, a local Dixieland-style band that specializes in Jazz worship – they do many of these services throughout Connecticut every year. Two of our choral anthems are in traditional a capella style, paying tribute to the Rev’d Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. But everything else, including and especially the hymns, are a time for you to tap your toes, move about, and sing praise with freedom and joy. Don’t be afraid – join in and sing loudly!

Introit    MLK    Words and music by U2, arr. Bob Chilcott (b. 1955)
Michael Mei, soloist

Sleep, sleep tonight
And may your dreams b
e realized
If the thundercloud passes rain
So let it rain
Rain on him 

Processional Hymn    Mine eyes have seen the glory   Battle Hymn

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Psalm 138    Antiphon and Chant Michael Guimont, 1994
Claudia Ayer, cantor

Sequence Hymn    He’s got the whole world in his hand

Offertory Anthem    Precious Lord, take my hand    George Allen, arr. Roy Ringwald (1910-1955)
Words by Thomas A. Dorsey, adapted by Joyce Merman following the death of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Claudia Ayer, soloist

Precious Lord, take my hand,
Bring me home through the night,
Through the dark, through the storm, to thy light.
I have been to the mount, I have seen the promised land,
Precious Lord, precious Lord, take my hand.

Precious Lord, take my hand,
Bring thy child home at last,
Where the strife and the pain are all past:
I have dreamed a great dream that thy love shall rule our land,
Precious Lord, precious Lord, take my hand.

Precious Lord, take my hand,
Take thy child unto Thee,
With my dream of a world that is free;
For that day when all flesh joins the glory thou hast planned,
Precious Lord, precious Lord, take my hand.

Sanctus (after “When the saints go marching in”)

Communion Motet   Agnus Dei (from A Little Jazz Mass)    Bob Chilcott (b. 1955)
Latin words from the Eucharist liturgy, at the Breaking of the Bread.

Hymn in Procession    We shall overcome

Voluntary    When the saints go marching in

The Hot Cat Jazz Band:
Trumpet: Ross Tucker
Clarinet: Andy Sherwood
Trombone: Tom Boates
Guitar: Norman Johnson
Bass: Donn Doucette
Drums: Sal Ranniello

February 3, 2019 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

February 3, 2019 + The Fourth Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Prelude and Fugue in C minor, BWV 549    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Prelude on Abbott’s Leigh    Carl D.N. Klein, 1991

Processional Hymn 569    God the Omnipotent, King who ordainest    Russia

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Psalm 19    Plainsong chant by the choir

Sequence Hymn 440    Blessed Jesus, at thy word    Liebster Jesu

Offertory Anthem   Swing low, sweet chariot     Spiritual, arr. Alice Parker (b. 1925)

Swing low, sweet chariot
Coming for to carry me home
Swing low, sweet chariot
Coming for to carry me home

I looked over Jordan, and what did I see
A band of angels coming after me
Sometimes I’m up, sometimes I’m down
Sometimes I’m almost to the ground

Alice Parker is a national treasure: America’s reigning queen of choral music. – American Record Guide
My twenty-years’ experience with Robert Shaw, an immersion in folk music of many kinds, has had a profound effect on my own understanding of song. I learned to see each tune as a small universe, setting up its own rules of pitch and rhythm, mood and dance. If I understand that universe, and work within it for my setting, the result is an organic whole that allows the original melody to flourish. – Alice Parker

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet   Beati quorum via    Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
Words: Psalm 119:1

Beati quorum via integra est: qui ambulant in lege Domini.  
Blessed are they whose way of life is wholesome: who walk in the law of the Lord.

Following the death of Purcell in 1695, English music went into a long period of decline that was not reversed until the late 19th century. Of the many musicians who helped to bring about the English musical renaissance it was Charles Stanford was one the most influential. This musical revival reached its full flowering with Elgar and continued with Vaughan Williams and a whole new generation of talented composers. This meditative text from Psalm 119 shows Stanford at his most lyrical.  

Hymn in Procession     Lord, you give the great commission    Abbott’s Leigh

Voluntary    Prelude to Te Deum     Marc-Antoine Charpentier (1634-1704)

January 27, 2019 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth Choirs of St. John’s & St. James’s, West Hartford, and Church of Christ, Congregational, Newington.

Click here for details.

January 27, 2019 + The Third Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Two Preludes    Flor Peeters (1903-1986)
Philip Tummescheit, organ

Processional Hymn 427    When morning gilds the skies    Laudes Domini

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Psalm 19    Plainsong chant by the choir

Sequence Hymn 539    O Zion, haste, thy mission high fulfilling    Tidings

Offertory Anthem    Magnificat in C minor    George Dyson (1883-1964)

My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Savior.
For he hath regarded the lowliness of his handmaiden.
For behold from henceforth, all generations shall call me blessed.
For he that is mighty hath magnified me, and holy is his Name.
And his mercy is on them that fear him throughout all generations.
He hath showed strength with his arm; he hath scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts.
He hath put down the mighty from their seat, and hath exalted the humble and meek.
He hath filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he hath sent empty away.
He remembering his mercy hath holpen his servant Israel, as he promised to our forefathers, Abraham and his seed for ever.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet    Nunc Dimittis in C minor    George Dyson

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace according to thy word.
For mine eyes have seen thy salvation,
Which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;
To be a light to lighten the Gentiles and to be the glory of thy people Israel.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be. World without end, amen.

Hymn in Procession 438    Tell out, my soul!    Woodlands

Voluntary    Trumpet Voluntary in D Major    David N. Johnson (1922-1988)

January 13, 2019 + The First Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Adagio from Symphony No. 5    Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)

Processional Hymn 76    On Jordan’s bank the Baptist’s cry   Winchester New

Sequence Hymn 513    Like the murmur of the dove’s song    Bridegroom

Offertory Anthem    Like as the hart desireth the waterbrooks   Herbert Howells (1892-1983)
Words: Psalm 42: 1-3

Like as the hart desireth the waterbrooks,
so longeth my soul after thee, O God.
My soul is athirst for God,
yea, even for the living God.
When shall I come to appear before the presence of God?
My tears have been my meat day and night,
while they daily say unto me,
“Where is now thy God?”

A powerful, pleading “where is my God” is the central message of the Howells Psalm setting, but even more powerful is the imagery of the deer in placid fields, yet thirsty. From the first notes of the introduction, the listener is drawn into a musical landscape, which sounds as if it was already in progress long before we began hearing it.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet     Tota pulchra es Maria     Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Words: Latin, 4th Century, sung by the women of the choir.

Tota pulchra es, Maria,
Et macula originalis non est in Te.
Tu gloria Ierusalem,
Tu laetitia Israel,
Tu honorificentia populi nostri.
Tu advocata peccatorum.
O Maria, Virgo prudentissima,
Mater clementissima.
Ora pro nobis,
Intercede pro nobis.,
Ad Dominum Iesum Christum.

You are all beautiful, Mary,
and the original stain (of sin) is not in you.
You are the glory of Jerusalem,
you are the joy of Israel,
you give honour to our people.
You are an advocate of sinners.
O Mary, Virgin most intelligent,
Mother most merciful.
Pray for us,
Plead for us,
To the Lord Jesus Christ.

Hymn in Procession    Shall we gather at the river   At the River

Voluntary    Fugue in D minor    Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

Buxtehude’s Toccatas are very different from the French Toccatas, made famous by Widor. Written in a free style in many tiny sections, each passing phrase brings on higher and more intense emotion. Presented today is the final fugue from one of these great works. Buxtehude was one of Bach’s mentors, and, after traveling to North Germany to study with him, Bach was nearly fired from his own church position for playing music that was too “out there.”

January 6, 2019 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

January 6, 2019 + The Feast of the Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by Michael Corey.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Variations on a Basque Noël    Carson Cooman, 2017

In an email to colleagues around the world, concert organist James Kibbie writes: “For the past 17 years, I’ve recorded a work on the beautiful little pipe organ in our home as an ‘audio holiday card.’  This year’s offering is Variations on a Basque Noël, written especially for this recording by Harvard University composer Carson Cooman.

Processional Hymn 128    We three kings of orient are Three    Kings of Orient

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 124    What star is this, with beams so bright    Puer nobis

Offertory Anthem    The first nowell    Stephen Paulus (1949-2014)
Words: English Carol, 18th Century, found at Hymn 109

What does ‘noel’ mean? “Nowell,” the English transliteration, comes from the old French “nouel,” which is now written in modern French as “noël.” The derivation of this word probably comes from the earlier Latin term “natalis,” relating to a birth. In Latin, “dies natalis” means “birthday.” Some suggest that “noel” is also related to “novellare” or “nouvelle” meaning “new” – something to tell. As hymnologist and hymn writer Carl P. Daw, Jr. indicates, The Oxford English Dictionary notes the earliest use of “nowel” in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (c. 1395), where the poet cites “The Franklin’s Tale” (1255): “And ‘Nowel’ crieth every lusty man.” (Notes by C. Michael Hawn)

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet    O magnum mysterium     Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

O magnum mysterium et admirabile sacramentum, ut animalia viderent Dominum natum jacentem in praesepio. O beata Virgo, cuius viscera meruerunt portare Dominum Jesum Christum. Alleluia.

O great mystery and wonderful sacrament, that beasts should see the new-born Lord lying in a manger. O blessed virgin, whose body was worthy to bear the Lord Jesus Christ. Alleluia.

Hymn in Procession 119    As with gladness, men of old    Dix

Voluntary    O morning star, how fair and bright    Egil Hovland (1924-2003)

December 30, 2018 + The First Sunday after Christmas

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. with hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Walter McKenney.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Once in royal David’s city    Andrew Moore (b. 1954)
Of the Father’s love begotten    Wilbur Held (1914-2015)

Opening Hymn 102    Once in royal David’s city    Irby

Sequence Hymn 98    Unto us a boy is born!    Puer nobis nascitur

Music at the Offertory    I wonder as I wander    David Lasky (b. 1957)

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Music at Communion    In dulci jubilo (In quiet joy)    Marcel Dupré (1886-1971)

Closing Hymn 115    What chid is this, who, laid to rest    Greensleeves

Voluntary    Joy to the world    Wilbur Held

Guest Organist: Ray Giolitto

December 25, 2018 + Christmas Day

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:00 a.m. with congregational carols, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     Pastorale on Forest Green    Richard Purvis (1913-1994)

Opening Hymn 96   Angels we have heard on high    Gloria

Sequence Hymn 78    O Little town of Bethlehem    Forest Green

Offertory    Pastorale    Louis-James-Alfred Lefébure-Wely (1817-1869)

Closing Hymn 100    Joy to the world!     Antioch

Voluntary    In dulci jubilo (In quiet joy)    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

December 24, 2018 + Christmas Eve

Service Schedule:

3:50 p.m.  Choral Prelude (Youth Choir)

4:00 p.m. Family Eucharist sung by the Youth Choir

10:30 p.m. Choral Prelude (Adult Choir) with string quartet

11:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist sung by the Adult Choir with string quartet

Worship at Home:

Click here: 4 p.m. Service Bulletin11 p.m. Service BulletinSermon Text

4 p.m. Service Live Stream:

11 p.m. Service Live Stream:

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Choral Prelude at 3:50 p.m. with the St. John’s Youth and Alumnae Choir

Hymn 102    Once in Royal David’s city    Irby
Stanzas 1 & 2, choir; stanzas 3-6, congregation

No small wonder    Paul Edwards (b. 1955)
Text: Paul Wigmore

Small wonder the star,
Small wonder the light,
The angels in chorus,
The shepherds in fright;
But stable and manger for God –
No small wonder!

Small wonder the kings,
Small wonder they bore
The gold and the incense,
The myrrh, to adore:
But God gives his life on a cross –
No small wonder!

Small wonder the love,
Small wonder the grace,
The power, the glory,
The light of his face;
But all to redeem my poor heart –
No small wonder!

Nativity carol    words and music by John Rutter (b. 1945)

Born in a stable so bare,
Born so long ago;
Born ‘neath light of star
He who loved us so.

Wise men from distant far land,
Shepherds from starry hills
Worship this babe so rare,
Hearts with his warmth he fills.

Cradled by mother so fair,
Tender her lullaby;
Over her son so dear
Angel hosts fill the sky.

Far away silent he lay,
Born today, your homage pay,
For Christ is born for aye,
Born on Christmas Day.

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 4:00 p.m. sung by the Youth and Alumnae Choir; sermon by The Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Processional Hymn 83    O come, all ye faithful    Adeste fideles, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 115    What child is this   Greensleeves

Offertory Anthem    Brightest and best     arr. Malcolm Archer (b. 1962)
Words: Reginald Heber (1783-1826)
Soloists: Britt Emerick, Emma Evica

Brightest and best of the sons of the morning,
Dawn on our darkness and lend us thine aid;
Star of the East, the horizon adorning,
Guide where our infant Redeemer is laid.

Cold on His cradle the dewdrops are shining;
Low lies His head with the beasts of the stall.
Angels adore Him in slumber reclining,
Maker and Monarch and Savior of all.

Shall we not yield Him, In costly devotion
Odors of Edom and offerings divine,
Gems of the mountain and pearls of the ocean,
Myrrh from the forest and gold from the mine?

Vainly we offer each ample oblation,
Vainly with gifts would His favor secure.
Richer by far is the heart’s adoration;
Dearer to God are the prayers of the poor.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem     Still, still, still    Austrian Carol, arr. Norman Luboff (1917-1987)
Words: Marilyn Keith, Alan Bergman

Still, still, still,
One can hear the falling snow.
For all is hushed,
The world is sleeping,
Holy Star its vigil keeping.
Still, still, still,
One can hear the falling snow.

Sleep, sleep, sleep,
‘Tis the eve of our Saviour’s birth.
The night is peaceful all around you,
Close your eyes,
Let sleep surround you.
Sleep, sleep, sleep,
‘Tis the eve of our Saviour’s birth.

Dream, dream, dream,
Of the joyous day to come.
While guardian angels without number,
Watch you as you sweetly slumber.
Dream, dream, dream,
Of the joyous day to come.

Communion Hymn 101    Away in a manger   Cradle Song

Post-communion Hymn 111     Silent night     Stille nacht

Closing Hymn 87     Hark the herald angels sing     Mendelssohn, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Voluntary    Carillon-Sortie    Henri Mulet (1878-1967)

+   +   +   +   +

Choral Prelude at 10:30 p.m. with the St. John’s Adult Choir and string quartet

Mark Rike and Laurel Thurman, violin
Mary Scripko, viola
Kathy Schiano, cello

String Quartet    Concerto Grosso Op. 6 No. 8 Per la notte di Natale     Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713)
I. Vivace – Grave – Allegro

Choir   Rise up, shepherd, and follow     African-American spiritual

There’s a star in the east on Christmas morn,
It will lead to the place where the Christ was born.
If you take good heed to the angel’s words,
You’ll forget your flocks, you’ll forget your herds,
Rise up, shepherd, and follow.

Follow, follow, rise up, shepherd, and follow,
Follow the star of Bethlehem,
Rise up, shepherd, and follow.

Choir    This is the truth sent from above    Traditional English, arr. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

This is the truth sent from above,
The truth of God, the God of love;
Therefore don’t turn me from your door,
But hearken all both rich and poor.

The first thing which I do relate,
Is That God did man create
The next thing which to you I tell,
Woman was made with man to dwell.

Thus we were heirs to endless woes,
Till God the Lord did interpose
For so a promise soon did run
That He’d redeem us with a Son.

And at this season of the year
Our blest Redeemer did appear
He here did live, and here did preach,
And many thousands He did teach.

Thus He in love to us behaved,
To show us how we must be saved
And if you want to know the way
Be pleased to hear what He did say.

String Quartet     Concerto Grosso Op. 6 No. 8 Per la notte di Natale     Arcangelo Corelli
II. Adagio – Allegro – Adagio

Choir   O radiant dawn    James MacMillan (b. 1959)

O Radiant Dawn, Splendour of eternal Light,
Sun of Justice:
come, shine on those who dwell in darkness
and the shadow of death.
Isaiah had prophesied,
‘The people who walked in darkness have seen the great light;
upon those who dwelt in the land of gloom a light has shone.’
Amen.

String Quartet    Concerto Grosso Op. 6 No. 8 Per la notte di Natale     Arcangelo Corelli
V. Largo – Pastorale

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 11:00 p.m. sung by the Adult choir with string quartet and organ; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Processional Hymn 83    O come, all ye faithful    Adeste fideles, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 115    What child is this   Greensleeves

Offertory Anthem   Still, still, still    Austrian Carol, arr. Norman Luboff (1917-1987)
Words: Marilyn Keith, Alan Bergman

Still, still, still,
One can hear the falling snow.
For all is hushed,
The world is sleeping,
Holy Star its vigil keeping.
Still, still, still,
One can hear the falling snow.

Sleep, sleep, sleep,
‘Tis the eve of our Saviour’s birth.
The night is peaceful all around you,
Close your eyes,
Let sleep surround you.
Sleep, sleep, sleep,
‘Tis the eve of our Saviour’s birth.

Dream, dream, dream,
Of the joyous day to come.
While guardian angels without number,
Watch you as you sweetly slumber.
Dream, dream, dream,
Of the joyous day to come.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet    O magnum mysterium     Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

O magnum mysterium et admirabile sacramentum, ut animalia viderent Dominum natum jacentem in praesepio. O beata Virgo, cuius viscera meruerunt portare Dominum Jesum Christum. Alleluia.

O great mystery and wonderful sacrament, that beasts should see the new-born Lord lying in a manger. O blessed virgin, whose body was worthy to bear the Lord Jesus Christ. Alleluia.

Communion Hymn 101    Away in a manger   Cradle Song

Postcommunion Hymn 111    Silent night    Stille nacht, st. 3 arr. Wolfgang Lindner

Closing Hymn 87    Hark the herald angels sing    Mendelssohn, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Voluntary    Carillon-Sortie    Henri Mulet (1878-1967)

December 23, 2018 + Fourth Sunday of Advent – Christmas Pageant

The St. John’s Christmas Pageant at 10:30 a.m., sung by the Adult and Youth Choirs, with Jeffrey Higgins and Thomas Hintz, trumpets.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Voluntary for two trumpets   Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Introit    Tota pulchra es Maria     Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Words: Latin, 4th Century

Tota pulchra es, Maria,
Et macula originalis non est in Te.
Tu gloria Ierusalem,
Tu laetitia Israel,
Tu honorificentia populi nostri.
Tu advocata peccatorum.
O Maria, Virgo prudentissima,
Mater clementissima.
Ora pro nobis,
Intercede pro nobis.,
Ad Dominum Iesum Christum.

You are all beautiful, Mary,
and the original stain (of sin) is not in you.
You are the glory of Jerusalem,
you are the joy of Israel,
you give honour to our people.
You are an advocate of sinners.
O Mary, Virgin most intelligent,
Mother most merciful.
Pray for us,
Plead for us,
To the Lord Jesus Christ.

Traditional Carols with brass, choir, and organ.

Anthem    Ding, dong, merrily on high    arr. Charles Wood (1866-1926)

Ding dong merrily on high,
In heav’n the bells are ringing:
Ding dong! verily the sky
Is riv’n with angel singing
Gloria Hosanna in excelsis!
E’en so here below, below,
Let steeple bells be swungen,
And “Io, io, io!”
By priest and people sungen
Gloria Hosanna in excelsis!
Pray you, dutifully prime
Your matin chime, ye ringers,
May you beautifully rhyme
Your eve’time song, ye singers
Gloria Hosanna in excelsis!

Voluntary   My spirit be joyful from Cantata 146   Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
arr. E. Power Biggs

Trumpets: Tom Hintz, Jeffrey Higgins

December 16, 2018 + Third Sunday of Advent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Two settings of Es ist ein Ros entsprungen    Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
Emma Lou Diemer (b. 1927)

Introit    Thou who wast rich    French Carol
Words: Frank Houghton (1894-1972)
Church School Children; Heidi Tummescheit, director

Thou who wast rich beyond all splendour,
All for love’s sake becamest poor;
Thrones for a manger didst surrender,
Sapphire-paved courts for stable floor.
Thou who wast rich beyond all splendour,
All for love’s sake becomes poor.

Thou who art God beyond all praising,
All for love’s sake becamest man;
Stooping so low, but sinners raising
Heavenwards by thine eternal plan.
Thou who art God beyond all praising,
All for love’s sake becamest man.

Thou who art love beyond all telling,
Saviour and King, we worship thee.
Emmanuel, within us dwelling,
Make us what thou wouldst have us be.
Thou who art love beyond all telling,
Saviour and King, we worship thee.

Processional Hymn 76    On Jordan’s bank the Baptist’s cry    Winchester New

Kyrie S-89     James McGregor, after Hans Leo Hassler

Sequence Hymn 66    Come, thou long-expected Jesus    Stuttgart

Offertory Anthem   Lux aurumque          Eric Whitacre (b. 1970)
Words by Edward Esch, translated to Latin by Charles Anthony Silvestri

Lux
calida gravisque pura velut aurum
et canunt angeli molliter
modo natum.

Light
warm and heavy as pure gold
and the angels sing softly
to the newborn babe.

From the composer: After deciding upon the poem by Edward Esch (I was immediately struck by its genuine, elegant simplicity), I had it translated into the Latin by the celebrated American poet Charles Anthony Silvestri. A simple approach was essential to the success of the work, and I waited patiently for the tight harmonies to shimmer and glow.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet     A spotless rose      Herbert Howells (1892-1983)
Words: German, 15th Century
Soloist: John Church

A spotless Rose is blowing,
Sprung from a tender root,
Of ancient seers’ foreshowing,
Of Jesse promised fruit;
Its fairest bud unfolds to light
Amid the cold, cold winter,
And in the dark midnight.

The Rose which I am singing,
Whereof Isaiah said,
Is from its sweet root springing,
In Mary, purest Maid;
For, through our God’s great love and might,
The blessed Babe she bare us,
In a cold, cold winter’s night.

Herbert Howells, who arguably more than anyone influenced British church music in the 20th century, was not himself a believer. Suitably, his A Spotless Rose was thought up in the least sacred of circumstances – Howells said it came to him as he was watching trains on the Bristol-Gloucester line from his cottage window. Moving trains seem a world away from the arching lines of the anthem itself, in which the flowing melody is carried first by the choir then a baritone soloist over a subdued chorale-like harmony. And, as is so often the case with Howells, a touch of brilliance is saved for the final chords. ‘I should like, when my time comes, to pass away with that magical cadence,’ wrote fellow composer Patrick Hadley. Jeremy Suter, master of music at Carlisle Cathedral agrees: ‘The scrunchy harmonies of the final few bars are pure, unadulterated bliss!’

Hymn in Procession 601    O day of God draw nigh    St. Michael

Voluntary    Prelude in G, BWV 550    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

December 9, 2018 + Festival of Lessons and Carols

Festival of Lessons and Carols at 3:00 p.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs.

Click here for all details.

December 9, 2018 + Second Sunday of Advent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Choral-Improvisation on Vom Himmel hoch (From heaven above)    Sigfrid Karg-Elert (1877-1933)
Prelude on Comfort, comfort ye my people    Paul Manz (1919-2009)

Processional Hymn 59    Hark! a thrilling voice is sounding    Merton

Kyrie S-89     James McGregor, after Hans Leo Hassler

Canticle of Zechariah    Blessed be the God of Israel    Merle’s Tune

Sequence Hymn 65    Prepare the way, O Zion    Bereden väg för Herran

Offertory Anthem    O radiant dawn    James MacMillan (b. 1959)

O Radiant Dawn, Splendour of eternal Light,
Sun of Justice:
come, shine on those who dwell in darkness
and the shadow of death.
Isaiah had prophesied,
‘The people who walked in darkness have seen the great light;
upon those who dwelt in the land of gloom a light has shone.’
Amen.

This piece comes from the Strathclyde Motets,  communion motets setting words of the liturgy for various Sundays and feasts. “O Radiant Dawn” is an antiphon for 21st December, the text (in English) is one of the “O Antiphons” which are used in the season of Advent.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet    O magnum mysterium     Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

O magnum mysterium et admirabile sacramentum, ut animalia viderent Dominum natum jacentem in praesepio. O beata Virgo, cuius viscera meruerunt portare Dominum Jesum Christum. Alleluia.

O great mystery and wonderful sacrament, that beasts should see the new-born Lord lying in a manger. O blessed virgin, whose body was worthy to bear the Lord Jesus Christ. Alleluia.

Tomás Luis de Victoria  was the most famous composer in 16th-century Spain, and was one of the most important composers of the Counter-Reformation, along with Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina and Orlando di Lasso. Victoria was not only a composer, but also an accomplished organist and singer as well as a Catholic priest. However, he preferred the life of a composer to that of a performer.

Hymn in Procession 67    Comfort, comfort ye my people    Psalm 42

Voluntary    Toccata in F    Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

December 2, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

December 2, 2018 + First Sunday of Advent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Bill Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Wachet auf, uft runs die Stimme    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn 56    O come, O come, Emmanuel    Veni, veni, Emmanuel

Kyrie S-89     James McGregor, after Hans Leo Hassler

Sequence Hymn 61    “Sleepers wake!” A voice astounds us    Wachet auf

Offertory Anthem    People, look east    Christopher Steel, 1982
Words: Eleanor Farjeon (1881-1965)

People, look east. The time is near
Of the crowning of the year.
Make your house fair as you are able,
Trim the hearth and set the table.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the guest, is on the way.

Furrows, be glad. Though earth is bare,
One more seed is planted there:
Give up your strength the seed to nourish,
That in course the flower may flourish.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the rose, is on the way.

Birds, though you long have ceased to build,
Guard the nest that must be filled.
Even the hour when wings are frozen
God for fledging time has chosen.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the bird, is on the way.

Stars, keep the watch. When night is dim
One more light the bowl shall brim,
Shining beyond the frosty weather,
Bright as sun and moon together.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the star, is on the way.

Angels, announce with shouts of mirth
Christ who brings new life to earth.
Set every peak and valley humming
With the word, the Lord is coming.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the Lord, is on the way.

“People, Look East” was written by Eleanor Farjeon (1881-1965) and was first published as “Carol of Advent” in Part 3 of “Modern Texts Written for or Adapted to Traditional Tunes” in The Oxford Book of Carols, 1928. Farjeon, a native of London, was a devout Catholic who viewed her faith as “a progression toward which her spiritual life moved rather than a conversion experience.” (The Presbyterian Hymnal Companion, p. 323) She achieved acclaim as an author of children’s nursery rhymes and singing games, and is best remembered for her poem “Morning Has Broken.”

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem    This is the truth sent from above    Traditional English, arr. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

This is the truth sent from above,
The truth of God, the God of love;
Therefore don’t turn me from your door,
But hearken all both rich and poor.

The first thing which I do relate,
Is That God did man create
The next thing which to you I tell,
Woman was made with man to dwell.

Thus we were heirs to endless woes,
Till God the Lord did interpose
For so a promise soon did run
That He’d redeem us with a Son.

And at this season of the year
Our blest Redeemer did appear
He here did live, and here did preach,
And many thousands He did teach.

Thus He in love to us behaved,
To show us how we must be saved
And if you want to know the way
Be pleased to hear what He did say.

Hymn in Procession 436    Lift up your heads, ye mighty gates    Truro

Voluntary    Fanfare on Wachet auf     Paul Manz (1919-2009)

November 25, 2018 + Last Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Prelude     Cesar Franck (1822-1890)

Processional Hymn 435    At the name of Jesus    King’s Weston

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 495    Hail, thou once despised Jesus    In Babilone

Offertory Anthem    Thou God of truth and love    Malcolm Archer (b. 1952)
Words: Charles Wesley (1707-1788)

Thou God of truth and love,
We seek thy perfect way,
Ready thy choice to approve,
Thy providence to obey:
Enter into thy wise design,
And sweetly lose our will in thine.

Why hast thou cast our lot
In the same age and place?
And why together brought
To see each other’s face?
To join with softest sympathy,
And mix our friendly souls in thee?

Didst thou not make us one,
That we might one remain,
Together travel on,
And bear each other’s pain;
Till all thy utmost goodness prove,
And rise renewed in perfect love?

O may thy Spirit seal
Our souls unto that day,
With all thy fulness fill,
And then transport away!
Away to our eternal rest,
Away to our Redeemer’s breast!

Malcolm Archer’s setting of this Charles Wesley text contains a highly lyrical melody and emotional connection. Pay special attention to the dramatic treatment of the middle verse: “Didst Thou not make us one, that being one we must remain? Together, travel on, and bear each others’ pain.” The text and tune lift up a universal message of following Christ, serving others, and God being with us in times of trouble.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Oculi omnium    Charles Wood (1866-1926)
Words: Psalm 144:15

Oculi omnium in te spirant Domine: et tu das illis escam in tempore opportuneGloria tibi Domine. Amen.

The eyes of all wait upon thee, O Lord: and thou givest them their meat in due season. Glory be to thee, O Lord. Amen.

Hymn in Procession 544    Jesus shall reign where’er the sun    Duke Street

Voluntary    Nun danket alle Gott, BWV 657    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Assisting Organist: Christa Rakich

November 22, 2018 + Thanksgiving Day

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:00 a.m. with hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Sermon Text

Service Music:

Voluntary    Berceuse    Louis Vierne (1870-1937)

Opening Hymn 290    Come, ye thankful people, come    St. George’s, Windsor

Sequence Hymn 433    We gather together    Kremser

Closing Hymn 397    Now thank we all our God    Nun danket alle Gott

Voluntary    Rigoudon    André Campra (1660-1744)

Organist: Ray Giolitto

November 18, 2018 + Twenty-sixth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Bill Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Two settings of Nun danket alle Gott    Robert Edward Smith, 1996
Paul Manz, 1992

Processional Hymn 632    O Christ, the Word Incarnate    Munich

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 571    All who love and serve your city    Charlestown

Offertory Anthem     Great is thy faithfulness    Gilbert Martin (b. 1941)
Words: Thomas Chisholm (1866-1960)

Great is thy faithfulness, O God my Father,
There is no shadow of turning with thee;
Thou changest not, thy compassions, they fail not
As thou hast been thou forever wilt be.

Great is thy faithfulness! Great is thy faithfulness!
Morning by morning new mercies I see;
All I have needed thy hand hath provided—
“Great is thy faithfulness,” Lord, unto me!

Summer and winter, and springtime and harvest,
Sun, moon and stars in their courses above,
Join with all nature in manifold witness
To thy great faithfulness, mercy and love.

Pardon for sin and a peace that endureth,
Thine own dear presence to cheer and to guide;
Strength for today and bright hope for tomorrow,
Blessings all mine, with ten thousand beside!

Thomas Chisholm wrote this hymn as a testament to God’s faithfulness through his very ordinary life.  Born in a log cabin in Franklin, Kentucky, Chisholm became a Christian when he was twenty-seven and entered the ministry when he was thirty-six, though poor health forced him to retire after just one year and work as an insurance agent. Still, even with a desk job, he wrote nearly 1,200 poems throughout his life, including several published hymns. Chisholm explained toward the end of his life, “My income has not been large at any time due to impaired health.  Although I must not fail to record here the unfailing faithfulness of a covenant-keeping God and that He has given me many wonderful displays of His providing care, for which I am filled with astonishing gratefulness.” Gilbert Martin, arranger, is a well-known American choral composer, and uncle to our Director of Music.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Tantum ergo sacramentum    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Words: St. Thomas Aquinas, c. 1264

Tantum ergo Sacramentum veneremur cernui:
Et antiquum documentum novo cedat ritui:
Præstet fides supplementum sensuum defectui.

Genitori, Genitoque laus et jubilatio,
Salus, honor, virtus quoque sit et benedictio:
Procedenti ab utroque compar sit laudatio. Amen.

Down in adoration falling, Lo! the sacred Host we hail,
Lo! o’er ancient forms departing newer rites of grace prevail;
Faith for all defects supplying, where the feeble senses fail.

To the Everlasting Father, and the Son Who reigns on high
With the Holy Ghost proceeding forth from Each eternally,
Be salvation, honour, blessing, might, and endless majesty. Amen.

Hymn in Procession 290    Come, ye thankful people, come    St. George’s, Windsor

Voluntary    Fantasia on Nun danket alle Gott    Sigfrid Karg-Elert (1877-1933)

November 11, 2018 + Twenty-fifth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Passacaglia in d minor, BuxWV 161     Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

Processional Hymn 608    Eternal Father, strong to save    Melita

Choral Anthem     Greater love hath no man      John Ireland (1879-1962)
Words: Song of Solomon 8:7,6; John 15:13; 1 Peter 2:24; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Peter 2:9; Romans 12:1
Claudia Ayer and John Nowacki, soloists

Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it. Love is strong as death. Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness. Ye are washed, ye are sanctified, ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus; Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. I beseech you, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.

This work was commissioned in 1912 for Charles Macpherson, the sub-organist of St Paul’s Cathedral. Intended as a meditation for Passiontide, Greater love hath no man drew its text from a compilation of scriptural passages in Daily Light on the Daily Path, a series of booklets containing Bible readings which Ireland used to observe on a regular basis. The anthem rapidly gained currency in cathedrals and church choirs and, with the outbreak of war in 1914, its text gained a special resonance as the casualties from the front mounted. Indeed, with Alice Meynell’s poem Summer in England, 1914, which contrasted the slaughter of Flanders’ fields with the tranquil scenes of England, and the subject of sacrifice emanating from pulpits throughout the land, Ireland discovered that his anthem inadvertently resonated with a wider national mood.

Sequence Hymn 705    As those of old their first fruits brought    Forest Green

Offertory Hymn    Great is thy faithfulness    Faithfulness

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    The eyes of all wait upon thee   Jean Berger (1909-2002)

The eyes of all wait upon thee and thou givest them their meat in due season.
Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of every living thing.

Hymn in Procession 57    Lo, he comes with clouds descending    Helmsley

Voluntary    Allegro maestoso e vivace from Sonata II    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Assisting Organist: Christa Rakich

November 4, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

November 4, 2018 + All Saints Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d William J. Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Meditation    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Processional Hymn 287    For all the saints, who from their labors rest    Sine Nomine

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 293    I sing a song of the saints of God    Grand Isle

Offertory Anthem     Kyrie eleison from Requiem    Maurice Duruflé

Kyrie eleison, Christe eleison, Kyrie eleison.
Lord, have mercy. Christ, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.

In 1947, Maurice Duruflé was already working on a suite of pieces for organ based on the Gregorian chants for the requiem mass (the service for the dead), when he was commissioned by his publisher Durand to write a large-scale work based on those texts. The resulting Requiem, originally for orchestra and chorus, is the culmination of Duruflé’s style, mixing chant, quasi-Renaissance counterpoint, and sumptuous harmony derived from Fauré, Debussy, and Ravel. 

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem   Agnus Dei from Requiem    Maurice Duruflé

Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona eis requiem.
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, grant them rest.

Hymn in Procession 286    Who are these like stars appearing    Zeuch mich, zeuch mich

Voluntary   Fugue in C minor, BWV 582   Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Assisting Organist: Christa Rakich

October 28, 2018 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the St. John’s Schola.

Click here for details.

 

October 28, 2018 + The Twenty-third Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Basse de Trompette     Jean-Adam Guilain (d. 1703)
Prelude in D     Johann K. F. Fischer (1665-1746)

Introit     Hear my words      Stephen Paulus (1949-2014)
Words from Psalm 5, sung by the Youth Choir.

Hear my words, O gracious Lord, to my thoughts attentive be;
Hear my cry, my King and my God. I will make my prayer to thee.
With the morning light, O Lord, thou shalt hear my voice arise;
And expectant I will bring, prayer as morning sacrifice.
Thou art Holy, O my God, thou delightest not in sin;
Evil shall not dwell with thee, nor the proud thy favor win.

Processional Hymn 410    Praise, my soul, the King of heaven    Lauda anima

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm 34:1-8, (19-22), Benedicam Dominum     Anglican Chant by Joseph Barnby

Sequence Hymn    If you have but one song to sing     St. Mark’s on Travis Square

Offertory Anthem     For the beauty of the earth   John Rutter (b. 1945)
Words: F. S. Pierpoint (1835-1917), found at Hymn 416.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    In this place    Will Todd (b. 1970)

In this place I have been made new;
I have been gifted jewels beyond price.
In this place greater dreams are given.
I am made everlasting.

In this place I am light,
In this place, in your sight
I am made everlasting.

In your love, starting and ending;
I will be carried softly to heaven.
In your love I am given beauty.
I am made everlasting.
You give the strength for me to hold,
You are the hope that shines like gold.
In this place I am new.
In your love I am true.

I will fly with angels to this place,
And be made everlasting.

Hymn in Procession 535    Ye servants of God, your master proclaim    Paderborn

Voluntary    Rigoudon    André Campra (1660-1744)

October 21, 2018 + The Twenty-second Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d William Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Three Legends     Carson Cooman, 2018
Adagio – Lento molto – Adagio molto, espressivo

Carson Cooman (b. 1982) is a Boston composer with a catalog of hundreds of works in many forms—from solo instrumental pieces to operas, and from orchestral works to hymn tunes. His music has been performed on all six inhabited continents in venues that range from the stage of Carnegie Hall to the basket of a hot air balloon. 

Processional Hymn 665    All my hope on God is founded    Michael

The original words of this hymn, “Meine Hoffnung stehet feste,” were written in around 1680 by Joachim Neander. In 1899 these were translated into English by Robert Bridges, who would later become British Poet Laureate. The hymn’s popularity increased when its pairing with the tune Michael by the English composer Herbert Howells became more widely known. Howells’ son, Michael, born in 1925, had died in childhood in 1935 from spinal meningitis. It is believed that shortly after this, in 1936, Howells received a request for a new hymn tune in the morning’s post, and he is said to have written the tune, which he named after his late son, over breakfast.

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn    Are ye able    Beacon Hill

Offertory Anthem     Christ is our cornerstone     Noel Rawsthorne (b. 1929)
Words: translated from the Latin by J. Chandler

Christ is our cornerstone, on him alone we build; with his true saints alone
The courts of heaven are filled; on his great love our hopes we place of present grace and joys above.

Here, gracious God, do thou forevermore draw nigh; accept each faithful vow,
And mark each suppliant sigh; in copious shower on all who pray, each holy day, thy blessings pour.

O then with hymns of praise these hallowed courts shall ring; our voices we will raise
The three in one to sing; and thus proclaim in joyful song both loud and long, that glorious name.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Ave verum corpus    William Byrd (1543-1623)
Words attributed to Pope Innocent VI (d. 1362)

Ave, verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine, vere passum immolatum in Cruce pro homine,
Cujus latus perforatum unda fluxit sanguine, esto nobis praegustatum in mortis examine.

Hail, true body born of the Virgin Mary, who truly suffered, sacrificed on the Cross for man,
Whose pierced side overflowed with blood, Be for us a foretaste in the test of death.

Hymn in Procession 580    God, who stretched the spangled heavens    Holy Manna

Voluntary    Flourish in G     Carson Cooman, 2018

October 14, 2018 + The Twenty-first Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     Prelude in E-flat Major, BWV 552    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn 680    O God, our help in ages past    St. Anne

Sequence Hymn 684    O for a closer walk with God    Caithness

Offertory Anthem   Zion’s Walls    Aaron Copland (1900-1990)

Come fathers and mothers, come sisters and brothers, come join us in singing the praises of Zion.
O fathers, don’t you feel determined to meet within the walls of Zion?
We’ll shout and go round the walls of Zion.

In the 1930s and ‘40s, Brooklyn-born and Paris-trained Aaron Copland produced orchestral ballets such as Billy the Kid, Rodeo, and especially Appalachian Spring, which illustrated his firm belief that American composers should write on American themes. To aid him in fashioning a uniquely “American” sound, the definition of which is still argued by musicologists today, Copland extensively researched nineteenth-century musical Americana such as minstrel-show songs, traditional ballads, children’s songs, political campaign tunes, and Revivalist hymns such as Zion’s Walls. Copland sets Zion’s Walls—a gathering-song which first appeared in the 1855 tune-book Sacred Harp—as alternately raucous or contemplative, but always heartfelt.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Lay up for yourselves    Ned Rorem (b. 1923)
Words: Matthew 6: 20-21

Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt,
And where thieves do not break through and steal.
For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

Hymn in Procession 601    O day of God, draw nigh    St. Michael

Voluntary    Fugue in E-flat Major, BWV 552 (“St. Anne”)    Johann Sebastian Bach

The Fugue in E-flat is loaded with 3s – three sections with distinct themes, representing the strength of God the Father, the youth of God the Son, and the joyful dancing of God the Holy Spirit. There are three distinct meters, yet they all “work together,” suggesting unity of the three parts. It gets much more complicated than that, and I’ll be happy to show you some very daunting formulas that show how Bach literally embedded theological meaning into the notes. It is a coincidence (or is it?) that the Father section echoes the hymn-tune for O God, our help in ages past.

October 7, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, is held on the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

October 7, 2018 + The Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     Variations on Christe Sanctorum     David Dahl (b. 1937)

Processional Hymn 405    All things bright and beautiful    Royal Oak

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 593 1-3    Lord, make us servants of your peace    Dickinson College

Hymn at the Blessing of the Animals 400    All creatures of our God and King     Lasst uns erfreuen

Offertory Anthem    Teach me, O Lord    Thomas Attwood (1765-1838)
Words: Psalm 119: 33

Teach me, O Lord, the way of thy statutes; and I shall keep it unto the end.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem   Draw us in the Spirit’s tether    Harold W. Friedell (1905-1958)
Text attributed to Percy Dearmer (1867-1936)

Draw us in the Spirit’s tether; for when humbly, in thy name,
Two or three are met together, thou art in the midst of them:
Alleluya! Alleluya! Touch we now thy garment’s hem.

As disciples used to gather in the name of Christ to sup,
Then with thanks to God the Father break the bread and bless the cup,
Alleluya! Alleluya! So knit thou our friendship up.

All our meals and all our living make as sacraments of thee,
That by caring, helping, giving, we may true disciples be.
Alleluya! Alleluya! We will serve thee faithfully.

The hymn-tune ‘Union Seminary’, named after the institution in New York City, was written by Harold W. Friedell when he was organist of Calvary Church in New York and then set as an anthem after he became organist of St. Bartholomew’s Church on Park Avenue. The matched Percy Dearmer text ‘Draw us in the Spirit’s tether’ is a powerful message of our common gathering as disciples, offering our lives as sacrifice to God.

Hymn in Procession 482    Lord of all hopefulness    Slane

Voluntary    Improvisation on Lasst uns erfreuen      Christa Rakich

Organist/Choirmaster: Christa Rakich

September 30, 2018 + The Ninteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary     Autumn Sketches    Carson Cooman (b. 1982)
Herbststimmung (Autumn Mood) –  Herbstfarben (Autumn Colors) – Sonnenuntergang (Sunset)

Three Autumn Sketches after a Watercolor by Maria Willscher (2017) are inspired by a watercolor painting by Maria (Neumann) Willscher (1922–1998) entitled “Herbststimmung.” The three movements explore moods and colors of autumn as reflected in the painting (found elsewhere in the bulletin).

Processional Hymn 657    Love divine, all loves excelling    Hyfrydol

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 301    Bread of the world in mercy broken    Rendez à Dieu

Offertory Anthem    The heavens are telling   Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Words: Christian Fürchtegott Gellert based on Psalm 14

The heavens are telling the Lord’s endless glory.
Through all the earth His praise is found.
The seas re-echo the marvelous story:
O man, repeat that glorious sound!
The starry hosts He doth order and number,
He fills the morning’s golden springs,
He wakes the sun from his night-curtain’d slumber;
O man, adore the King of Kings!

The heavens are His and the earth knows His favor,
His power in all things thou dost see;
The Lord of hosts who for ever and ever
Thy God and Father still shall be.
He is thy Maker whose love shall not waver,
A God of wisdom, ever kind;
Praise Him and love Him with all thy endeavor,
In Him salvation shalt thou find.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Nunc dimittis in D    George Dyson (1883-1964)
Words: The song of Simeon, Luke 2:29-32

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace according to thy word.
For mine eyes have seen thy salvation,
Which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;
To be a light to lighten the Gentiles and to be the glory of thy people Israel.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be. World without end, amen.

Hymn in Procession    What a friend we have in Jesus    Converse

Voluntary   Counterpoint on Hyfrydol      Christa Rakich

Organist/Choirmaster: Christa Rakich


“Herbststimmung.”
Maria (Neumann) Willscher (1922–1998)

September 23, 2018 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs.

Click here for details.

 

September 23, 2018 + The Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Right Rev’d James Curry.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Sonata No. 2 in C minor    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
Grave – Adagio

Processional Hymn 477    All praise to thee, for thou, O King divine    Engelberg

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm 1    Anglican Chant by Alec Wyton (1921-2007)

Sequence Hymn 602    Jesu, Jesu, fill us with your love    Chereponi

Offertory Anthem    Sweet shepherd of mine     Scott Lamlein, 2018
Words: Mary Davies Cole, 2018, from Psalm 23

Sweet shepherd of mine, how could I long
for anything more than the sound of your voice? The soft green of earth and bed of pine,
you lay me down in the arms of Creation.

You lead me by the rivers of Life –
you restore the soul of my being,
the center of all I truly am,
within the safe circle of Heaven’s own.

Even the dark of the blackest night
cannot hide the path you have given to me. Death falls away at the sound of your voice, evil cannot hold, nor injustice thrive.

For You are my Comforter, my Guard, my Guide. In the presence of my enemies,
you cloak me in light,
you sing me into safety,

your heart will be my home

all the days of my life,
without end, amen, and amen.

Mary Davies Cole is a member of St. John’s and poet. She wrote these words as an alternate version of Psalm 23 for our Celtic Service early this year. Both Mary and Scott described the process of writing this work as an easy flow – which is usually not true for either of them, as both poetry and musical composition is often an endless task of revision. The words and music seemed to come directly “from above” to the paper, which was a humbling and beautiful experience. The gentle piano accompaniment invokes a flowing brook in a pastoral scene – still, calming waters.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Only for these I pray    Peter Niedmann, 1996
Words: Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Only for these I pray, pray with assurance strong.
Light to discover the way, power to follow it long.
Let me have light to see, light to be sure and know,
When the road is clear to me willingly I go.

Let me have power to do, power of the brain and nerve,
Though the task is heavy and new willingly I will serve.
My prayers are lesser than three, nothing I pray but two;
Let me have light to see, let me have power to do.

Peter Niedmann is Director of Music and Organist at Church of Christ, Congregational, in Newington, and composition coach for Scott Lamlein. He is a published composer with hundreds of works in print, and Dean of the Hartford American Guild of Organists. His choral music has been sung at The White House and a Papal Mass for Pope John Paul II.

Hymn in Procession 660    O Master, let me walk with thee    Maryton

Voluntary   Fugue from Sonata No. 2    Felix Mendelssohn

September 16, 2018 + The Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost

Morning Prayer Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Walter McKenney.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 550    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn 427    When morning gilds the skies    Laudes Domini

Venite S34   Gregorian Chant

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Magnificat in D    George Dyson (1883-1964)

My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Savior.
For he hath regarded the lowliness of his handmaiden.
For behold from henceforth, all generations shall call me blessed.
For he that is mighty hath magnified me, and holy is his Name.
And his mercy is on them that fear him throughout all generations.
He hath showed strength with his arm; he hath scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts.
He hath put down the mighty from their seat, and hath exalted the humble and meek.
He hath filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he hath sent empty away.
He remembering his mercy hath holpen his servant Israel, as he promised to our forefathers, Abraham and his seed for ever.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Sermon Hymn 455    O Love of God, how strong and true    Dunedin

Anthem    Ubi caritas    Ola Gjeilo (b. 1978)
Words from the Maundy Thursday liturgy

Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Congregavit nos in unum Christi amor.
Exsultemus, et in ipso jucundemur. Timeamus, et amemus Deum vivum.
Et ex corde diligamus nos sincero.
Where charity and love are, God is there. Christ’s love has gathered us into one.
Let us rejoice and be pleased in him. Let us fear, and let us love the living God.
And may we love each other with a sincere heart.

Ola Gjeilo writes: The first time I sang in a choir was in high school; I went to a music high school in Norway and choir was obligatory. I loved it from the very first rehearsal, and the first piece we read through was Maurice Duruflé’s Ubi Caritas. It will always be one of my favorite choral works of all time; to me, it’s the perfect a cappella piece. ​So when I set the same text myself a few years later, it was inevitable that the Duruflé would influence it, and it did. While Duruflé used an existing, traditional chant in his piece, I used chant more as a general inspiration, while also echoing the form and dynamic range of his incomparable setting of the text.

Offertory Anthem   I will sing with the spirit    David Goodenough, 2006
Words: 1 Corinthians 14: 15; Psalm 96: 1

This piece is a setting of the Royal School of Church Music motto, I will sing with the spirit and also with the understanding, paired with Psalm 96:1: O sing unto the Lord a new song; sing unto the Lord all the earth. It serves as a blessing to our choirs as they embark on a new year of learning, singing, and praise.

Closing Hymn 525     The church’s one foundation    Aurelia

Voluntary    Carillon de Longpont    Louis Vierne (1870-1937)

September 9, 2018 + The Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. with music by the Hartford Steel Symphony, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

St. John’s Community Block Party to follow! Click here for details.

September 2, 2018 + The Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Youth Choir, sermon by Michael Corey.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Two Spirituals    arr. Wilbur Held (1914 – 2015)
Deep River – Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
Ray Giolitto, organist

Processional Hymn 423    Immortal, invisible, God only wise    St. Denio

Sequence Hymn 660    O Master, let me walk with thee    Maryton

Offertory Anthem    Youth Choir

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 436    Lift up your heads, ye mighty gates    Truro

Voluntary    Choral Song    Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)

August 26, 2018 + The Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Canzona on Liebster Jesu    Richard Purvis (1917-1992)

Processional Hymn 321    My God, thy table now is spread    Rockingham

Sequence Hymn 440    Blessed Jesus, at thy word    Liebster Jesu

Offertory Anthem    Ave verum corpus   Edward Elgar (1901-1930)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 522    Glorious things of thee are spoken    Austria

Voluntary   Grand Choeur on Austria    Richard Purvis

August 19, 2018 + The Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers, sermon by the Rev’d Bill Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   The peace may be exchanged from Rubrics    Dan Locklair, 1988

Processional Hymn 460    Alleluia! Sing to Jesus!    Hyfrydol

Sequence Hymn   All who hunger gather gladly    Holy Manna

Offertory Anthem   My shepherd will supply my need    Virgil Thomson (1886-1989)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 488    Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart    Slane

Voluntary    Toccata in F    Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

August 12, 2018 + The Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Rhosymedre     Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1920

Processional Hymn 48    O day of radiant gladness    Es flog ein kleins Waldvogelein

Sequence Hymn 674    Forgive our sins as we forgive    Detroit

Offertory Anthem    God be in my head    Walford Davies (1869-1941)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 344    Lord, dismiss us with thy blessing    Sicilian Mariners

Voluntary   Andante Largo in D for Trumpet    John Stanley (1713-1786)

August 5, 2018 + The Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers, sermon by Michael Corey.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Aria from the 12th Concerto    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)

Processional Hymn 527    Singing songs of expectation    Ton-y-Botel

Sequence Hymn 302    Father, we thank thee who hast planted    Rendez à Dieu

Offertory Anthem    Lord, lead us still     Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 690    Guide me, O thou great Jehovah    Cwm Rhondda

Voluntary    Trumpet Tune in D    Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

July 29, 2018 + The Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with organ and hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Variations on Wer nur den lieben Gott    Johann Christian Kittel (1732-1809)

Processional Hymn 635    If thou but trust in God to guide thee    Wer nur den lieben Gott

Sequence Hymn 304    I come with joy to meet my Lord    Land of Rest

Offertory Music    Improvisation on Land of Rest

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 309    O food to pilgrims given    O Welt, ich muss dich lassen

Voluntary    O Welt, ich muss dich lassen     Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

Organist: Christa Rakich

July 22, 2018 + The Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with organ and hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Adagio, from Sonata I    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Processional Hymn 537    Christ for the world we sing    Moscow

Sequence Hymn 343    Shepherd of souls, refresh and bless    St. Agnes

Offertory Music    Menuet Gothique    Léon Boëllmann (1862-1897)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 708    Savior, like a shepherd lead us    Sicilian Mariners

Voluntary    Processional    Robert Paoli, 1991

July 15, 2018 + The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with organ and hymns, sermon by the Rev’d William Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Schmücke dich, O liebe Seele    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Deck thyself, my soul, with gladness

Processional Hymn 372    Praise to the living God    Leoni

Sequence Hymn 660    O master, let me walk with thee    Maryton

Offertory Music    Prelude on Leoni    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 436    Lift up your heads, ye mighty gates    Truro

Voluntary    Short Prelude & Fugue in G, BWV 557     Johann Sebastian Bach

July 8, 2018 + The Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with organ and hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Walter McKenney.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Pastorale in F    J. S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn 657    Love divine, all loves excelling    Hyfrydol

Sequence Hymn 671    Amazing grace! how sweet the sound    New Britain

Offertory Music    Andante, from Sonata VI    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 535    Ye servants of God, your Master proclaim    Paderborn

Voluntary   Postlude in G    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)

July 1, 2018 + The Sixth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with organ and hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Prelude on Cwm Rhondda    Paul Manz (1919-2009)

Processional Hymn 594    God of grace and God of glory    Cwm Rhondda

Sequence Hymn 705    As those of old their first fruits brought    Forest Green

Offertory Music    Pastorale on Forest Green   Richard Purvis (1913-1994)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Closing Hymn 719    O beautiful for spacious skies    Materna

Voluntary    Trumpet Voluntary in D Major    Jeremiah Clarke (1674-1707)

June 24, 2018 + The Fifth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with organ and hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Sonata in Sea – Wellfleet    James Woodman (b. 1957)

Processional Hymn 565    He who would valiant be    Monk’s Gate

Sequence Hymn 636    How firm a foundation    Foundation

Offertory Music    The Lord is my shepherd    Howard Goodall (b. 1958)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Communion Music   How beautiful are the feet of them (from Messiah)    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)

Closing Hymn 608    Eternal Father, Strong to Save    Melita

Voluntary   Sonata in Sea – Provincetown     James Woodman

Organist: Christa Rakich
Soloist: Daaé Ransom

June 17, 2018 + The Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with organ and hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Bill Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary  Two settings of Jesus, meine Zuversicht (Jesus, my Assurance)    J. S. Bach (1685-1750), J. G. Walther (1684-1748)

Processional Hymn 524    I love thy kingdom, Lord    St. Thomas (Williams)

Sequence Hymn 209    We walk by faith, and not by sight    St. Botolph

Offertory Music   Angels, Ever Bright and Fair    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)

Sanctus S125    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Communion Music   If Ye Love Me    Philip Wilby, b. 1949

Closing Hymn   I love to tell the story    Hankey

Voluntary   Sonne der Gerechtigkeit (Sun of Righteousness)    E. Pepping (1901-1981)

Guest Organist: Douglas Johnson
Soloist: Margaret Beers

 

June 10, 2018 + The Third Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Carillon de Westminster    Louis Vierne (1870-1937)

Processional Hymn 381    Thy strong word did cleave the darkness    Ton-y-botel

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn   When peace like a river    It Is Well

Offertory Anthem   Since by man came death (from Messiah)    George Frederick Handel (1685-1759)
Text: I Corinthians 15:21-22

Since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead.
For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Nunc dimittis: Collegium Regale    Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word;
For mine eyes have seen thy salvation which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;
To be a light to lighten the Gentiles, and to be the glory of thy people Israel.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;
As it was in the beginning is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Closing Hymn 620    Jerusalem, my happy home    Land of Rest

Voluntary    Pro organo flagrante    James Woodman, 2012

 

June 3, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

 

The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

June 3, 2018 + The Second Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Fantasia    Margaretha Christina de Jong, 2016

Margaretha Christina de Jong is a Dutch organist and composer whose music has wide appeal. Researching one of her larger works, Christa arranged to meet her in person in 2012. Since de Jong was raised in the Dutch Reform tradition, much of her organ music is based on Dutch Psalm tunes. As their friendship grew, Christa commissioned her to compose a piece based on the Gregorian melody Salve Regina. The result is a Fantasia that uses French Romantic harmonies, with a hint of Duke Ellington mixed in.

Introit   Choristers’ Prayer   Jack Richard Hodkinson, 2015
Words: Sir Sidney Nicholson (1875-1947)

Bless, O Lord, us Thy servants who minister in Thy temple.
Grant that what we sing with our lips we may believe in our hearts,
and what we believe in our hearts we may show forth in our lives.
Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Processional Hymn 48    O day of radiant gladness    Es flog ein kleins Waldvogelein

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 655     O Jesus, I have promised     Nyland

Offertory Anthem    Psalm 150   Philip Stopford, 2017

O praise God in his holiness
praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him in his noble acts
praise him according to his excellent greatness.
Praise him in the sound of the trumpet
praise him upon the lute and harp.
Praise him in the cymbals and dances
praise him upon the strings and pipe.
Praise him upon the well-tuned cymbals
praise him upon the loud cymbals.
Let every thing that hath breath
praise the Lord.

Philip Stopford is a contemporary English composer who began his career as a youth chorister at Westminster Abbey, singing under Simon Preston and Martin Neary. His music is equally popular with American choirs as it is with English ones, due to his accessible yet thought-provoking compositional style. Our Youth Choir (along with the choir of St. James’s Church and the Trinity College Chapel Singers) premiered Psalm 150 by Philip at the Albert Schweitzer Organ Festival in October, and collaborated on recording it two weeks ago.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Eternal light   Leo Sowerby (1895-1968)
Words: Alcuin Albinus Flaccus (c. 735-804)

Eternal Light, shine into our hearts,
Eternal Goodness, deliver us from evil,
Eternal Power, be our support,
Eternal Wisdom, scatter the darkness of our ignorance,
Eternal Pity, have mercy upon us;
that with all our heart and mind and soul and strength
we may seek thy face
and be brought by thy infinite mercy to thy holy presence;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Closing Hymn 7    Christ, whose glory fills the skies    Ratisbon

Voluntary    Pro Organo Pleno    James Woodman, 2012

 

May 27, 2018 + Trinity Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    We all believe in one true God    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Promenade on Nicaea (2015)     June Nixon (b. 1942)

Processional Hymn 362    Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!    Nicaea

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 367    Round the Lord in glory seated    Rustington

Offertory Anthem    In the year that King Uzziah died    David McK. Williams (1887-1978)
Words: Isaiah 6:1-8

The prophet Isaiah had a remarkable vision of the heavenly realm, beginning In the year that King Uzziah died. His celestial vision depicts the highest order of angels, Seraphim. The name Seraphim is associated with the Hebrew verb which means “to burn,” suggesting that the Seraphim burn with devotion for God. The Seraphim, from Isaiah’s vision, have six wings. In the choral arrangement heard today, tone painting is used to dramatic effect, depicting the angels flying around the throne of God, using the lowest 32’ tones of the organ for quasi-tympani effects, and presenting the familiar Sanctus text with great emotion – here heard within its original context. The work ends plaintively, with Isaiah answering God’s call.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Silent, surrendered         Margaret Rizza (b. 1929)
Words: Pamela Hayes and Margaret Rizza

Silent, surrendered, calm and still, open to the word of God.
Heart humbled to his will, offered is the servant of God.
Come, Holy Spirit, bring us light, teach us, heal us, give us life.
Come, Lord, O let our hearts flow with love and all that is true.

Closing Hymn 719    O beautiful for spacious skies    Materna

Voluntary    Alleluyas    Simon Preston (b. 1938)

The closing voluntary by Simon Preston is an unusual acclamation of praise. Preston, for many years music director at Westminster Abbey and well-known as a concert organist, uses a tension-building 4-note theme and jazz harmonies to set the word “Alleluia” with a strong emphasis on the third syllable.

 

May 20, 2018 + The Day of Pentecost – Youth Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Youth Choir, sermon by our graduating Seniors.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Verse on the 6th tone     A.V. den Kerckhoven (1627-1673)
Prelude    Flor Peeters (1903-1986)
Philip Tummescheit, organ

Processional Hymn 225    Hail thee, festival day!    Salve festa dies

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn   For the beauty of the earth    Dix

Offertory Anthem   Gracious spirit, dwell with me   K. Lee Scott (b. 1950)
Text: Thomas T. Lynch, 1855

Gracious Spirit, dwell with me, I would gracious be;
Help me now thy grace to see, I would be like thee;
And, with words that help and heal, thy life would mine reveal;
And, with actions bold and meek, for Christ, my Savior, speak.

Truthful Spirit, dwell with me, I would truthful be;
Help me now thy truth to see, I would be like thee;
And, with wisdom kind and clear, thy life in mine appear;
And, with actions brotherly, speak Christ’s sincerity.

Holy Spirit, dwell with me, I would holy be;
Show thy mercy tenderly, make me more like thee;
Separate from sin, I would and cherish all things good,
And whatever I can be give him who gave me thee.

Mighty Spirit, dwell with me, I would mighty be;
Help me now thy pow’r to see, I would be like thee;
‘Gainst all weapons hell can wield, be thou my strength and shield;
Let thy word my weapon be, Lord, thine the victory.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem   Veni Creator Spiritus   Gregorian Chant

Closing Hymn 405     All things bright and beautiful       Royal Oak

Closing Song   He’s got the whole world in his hands   Traditional

 

May 13, 2018 + The Seventh Sunday of Easter

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Prelude on In Babilone    Michael Burkhardt, 1992

Processional Hymn 460    Alleluia! sing to Jesus!    Hyfrydol

Song of Praise S236    Glory to you    John Rutter (b. 1945)

Sequence Hymn 215    See the Conqueror mounts in triumph    In Babilone

Offertory Anthem    Ain’-a that good news    William Dawson (1899-1990)

I got a crown up in-a that kingdom,
Ain’t-a that good news!
I’m-a gonna lay down this world,
gonna to shoulder up-a my cross.
Gonna to take it home-a to my Jesus,
Ain’t-a that good news!

I got a harp up in-a that kingdom…

I got a robe up in-a that kingdom…

I got a Savior in-a that kingdom…

A major step forward in the performance of spirituals came with the leadership of William L. Dawson, who directed the Tuskegee Institute Choir in Alabama from 1931-55. Dawson began his tenure at Tuskegee by bringing a 100-voice college choir to perform at the opening of Radio City Music Hall in New York City for an entire week in 1932. In Dawson’s arrangements the rhythmic momentum of the song brings to mind the contemporary accounts of the slaves singing in a ring shout, where they “would make the dense old woods, for miles around, reverberate with their wild songs.” His trademark closing phrases are full of richly voiced extended harmonies that bring the accumulated rhythmic energy to an ecstatic conclusion.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem   Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    O send out your light    Scott Lamlein, 2009
Words: Psalm 43:1-2

O send out your light and your truth, let them lead me;
Let them bring me to your holy hill and to your dwelling.
Then I will go to the altar of God, to God my exceeding joy;
And I will praise you with the harp.
O send out your light and your truth, let them lead me, O God, my God.

Closing Hymn 494    Crown him with many crowns    Diademata

Voluntary    Rondeau (from Symphonies de Fanfares)   Jean Joseph Mouret (1682-1738)

 

May 6, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

May 6, 2018 + The Sixth Sunday of Easter

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by Rabbi Stephen Fuchs.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Jerusalem    C. Hubert H. Parry (1848-1918)
The peace may be exchanged from Rubrics    Dan Locklair, 1988

Today’s first Voluntary celebrates three years of the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton’s ministry with us. Far from just an Anglophilic anthem, Hubert Parry’s Jerusalem is a powerful and dramatic musical setting of the poem with the same title by William Blake that imagines a visit to England by Christ himself during a time of great strife and tumult. The inspiration for Dan Locklair’s five-movement suite,  Rubrics, was the italicized rubrics (instructions) found within the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. Finding power within these simple notes, Dan brings them to life in music. The peace may be exchanged is a beautiful, lyric peace-prayer, using the warm string and diapason sounds of the organ. 

Processional Hymn 400, vv. 1, 2, 3, 4, 7    All creatures of our God and King    Lasst uns erfreuen

Sequence Hymn 455    O Love of God, how strong and true    Dunedin

Offertory Anthem    Cantate Domino   Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643)
Words from Psalm 96 and 98

Cantate Domino canticum novum, cantate et benedicite nomini eius,
quia mirabilia fecit. Cantate et exultate et psallite, psallite in cithara
et voce psalmi, quia mirabilia fecit.

O sing unto the Lord a new song, sing and praise his name: for he hath
done marvellous things. Sing, rejoice, and give thanks. Sing to the harp
with a psalm.

The text for this motet is liberally adapted from Psalm 98 and Psalm 96, which are both songs of celebration for God’s victory over the enemies of Israel. Monteverdi’s abbrevation of Psalm 98 focuses on the musical imagery of songs and instruments, and compresses the text into two groups of three verses, each ending with the phrase, “for he has done wonderful things.” This setting is also in six parts with continuo.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem   Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Motet    Ubi caritas    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Words from the Maundy Thursday liturgy

Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Congregavit nos in unum Christi amor.
Exsultemus, et in ipso jucundemur. Timeamus, et amemus Deum vivum.
Et ex corde diligamus nos sincero.
Where charity and love are, God is there. Christ’s love has gathered us into one.
Let us rejoice and be pleased in him. Let us fear, and let us love the living God.
And may we love each other with a sincere heart.

Closing Hymn 412    Earth and all stars, loud rushing planets    Earth and All Stars

 

April 29, 2018 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the St. John’s Youth and Adults Choirs.

Click here for details.

 

April 29, 2018 + The Fifth Sunday of Easter

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Chorale and Prelude on Abbott’s Leigh    Carl D.N. Klein, 1991

Processional Hymn 379    God is love: let heaven adore him    Abbott’s Leigh

Song of Praise S236    Glory to you    John Rutter (b. 1945)

Psalm 22:24-30    Anglican Chant by Shirley Hill

Sequence Hymn   O blessed spring    Berglund

Offertory Anthem    Thou God of truth and love    Malcolm Archer (b. 1952)
Words: Charles Wesley (1707-1788)

Thou God of truth and love,
We seek thy perfect way,
Ready thy choice to approve,
Thy providence to obey:
Enter into thy wise design,
And sweetly lose our will in thine.

Why hast thou cast our lot
In the same age and place?
And why together brought
To see each other’s face?
To join with softest sympathy,
And mix our friendly souls in thee?

Didst thou not make us one,
That we might one remain,
Together travel on,
And bear each other’s pain;
Till all thy utmost goodness prove,
And rise renewed in perfect love?

O may thy Spirit seal
Our souls unto that day,
With all thy fulness fill,
And then transport away!
Away to our eternal rest,
Away to our Redeemer’s breast!

Malcolm Archer’s setting of this Charles Wesley text contains a highly lyrical melody and emotional connection. Pay special attention to the dramatic treatment of the middle verse: “Didst Thou not make us one, that being one we must remain? Together, travel on, and bear each others’ pain.” The text and tune lift up a universal message of following Christ, serving others, and God being with us in times of trouble.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem   Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    O taste and see   Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
Words: Psalm 34:8

O taste and see how gracious the Lord is: blessed is the man that trusteth in him.

Closing Hymn 344    Lord dismiss us with thy blessing    Sicilian Mariners

Voluntary   Processional    William Mathias (1934-1992)

 

April 22, 2018 + The Fourth Sunday of Easter

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Bill Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Passacaglia: The prodigal son    James Biery (b. 1956)

A passacaglia is a musical work in which a single line of music is repeated over and over, usually in the bass, and continuous themeatic development happens in the upper parts – much like the famous Pachelbel Canon. James Biery’s Passacaglia takes the listener through all of the emotions of the Prodigal Son story – questioning, loss, pain, quiet resolution – finally quoting the hymn-tune St. Columba.

Processional Hymn 518    Christ is made the sure foundation     Westminster Abbey

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle

Sequence Hymn 645    The King of love my shepherd is    St. Columba

Offertory Anthem    My shepherd will supply my need    American Folk Melody, arr. Virgil Thomson (1896-1989)
Words: Isaac Watts (1674-1748), para. Psalm 23, found at Hymn 664

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem   Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    The Lord is my Shepherd from Requiem     John Rutter (b. 1945)
Words: Psalm 23
Nancy Skeele, flute

Quiet and serene, this pastoral setting of Psalm 23 offers a sweeping Rutter melody and a gorgeous flute solo that hovers gently above the choir. It creates an ethereal moment that so capably interprets the peaceful assurance of the beloved text.

Closing Hymn 304    I come with joy to meet my Lord    Land of Rest

Voluntary    Carillon    Herbert Murrill (1909-1952)

 

April 15, 2018 + The Third Sunday of Easter: Confirmation

Holy Eucharist Rite II and Confirmation at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rt. Rev’d Ian Douglas.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Adagio from Symphony No. 5    Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)

Processional Hymn 182    Christ is alive! Let Christians sing    Truro

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle

Sequence Hymn    What shall I cry!    Finlandia

Offertory Anthem    The Spirit of the Lord    Philip Stopford (b. 1977)
Words from Isaiah 61

The spirit of the Lord is upon me,
Because he hath anointed me to preach the Gospel to the poor.
He hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives
And recovering of sight to the blind, To preach the acceptable year of the Lord,
To give unto them that mourn a garland of ashes, the oil of joy for mourning,
The garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness,
That they might be called trees of righteousness,
The planting of the Lord that he might be glorified.
For as the earth bringeth forth her bud,
And as the garden causeth the things that are sown in it to spring forth,
So the Lord God will cause righteousness and praise to spring forth before the nations.

Philip Stopford is a contemporary English composer who began his career as a youth chorister at Westminster Abbey, singing under Simon Preston and Martin Neary. His music is equally popular with American choirs as it is with English ones, due to his accessible yet thought-provoking compositional style. Our Youth Choir (along with the choir of St. James’s Church) premiered a new work by Philip at the Albert Schweitzer Organ Festival in October, and will collaborate on recording it in May.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem   Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    God be in my head    Walford Davies (1869-1941)
Words: Sarum Primer, 1514, found at Hymn 694

The apparent simplicity of God be in my head, with its repetition of the key phrase, suddenly gives way to very effective harmonic sophistication on the word ‘heart’ that lays the path for the twilit ambience of the final phrase. H. Walford Davies was composer and musical director at the University of Wales as well as Organist at, among others, Temple Church, where his student Leopold Stokowski (later one of the leading conductors of the 20th century) assisted him.

Closing Hymn 205    Good Christians all, rejoice and sing!    Gelobt sei Gott

Voluntary   Gelobt sei Gott    Healey Willan (1880-1968)

April 8, 2018 + The Second Sunday of Easter

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the St. John’s Schola, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Prelude on Puer nobis    Alec Wyton (1921-2007)

Processional Hymn 208    Alleluia! The strife is o’er, the battle done    Victory

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle

Sequence Hymn 193    That Easter day with joy was bright    Puer nobis

Offertory Anthem   This joyful Eastertide    arr. Charles Wood (1866-1926)
Words: George R. Woodward (1848-1926), found at Hymn 192

The tune of popular Easter carol This joyful eastertide is Dutch and first showed up in the 1680s. This arrangement from 1901 is by the Irish composer Charles Wood. He studied with Stanford at the Royal College of Music in London, and he would himself become a Professor of Music there, where his pupils would include Ralph Vaughan Williams and Herbert Howells.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem   Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    O sons and daughters, let us sing!   O filii et filiae, arr. John Church, 2016
Words: att. Jean Tisserand (15th cent.); tr. John Mason Neale (1818-1866), found at Hymn 206

Closing Hymn 180    He is risen, he is risen!    Unser Herrscher

Voluntary    Trumpet Tune in D     John Stanley (1713-1786)

St. John’s Schola: Claudia Ayer, Anne Harney, Helen Douglas, Nancy Skeele, Stephan Christiansen, Scott Lamlein, Rich Barstow, John Nowacki

April 1, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

April 1, 2018 + The Sunday of the Resurrection: Easter Day

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs with brass and timpani, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary   Pièce héroïque   César Franck (1822-1890)

Introit    Easter people, raise your voices!    Scott Lamlein, 2014
Words: William M. James (1913-2013)

Easter people, raise your voices, sounds of heaven in earth should ring.
Christ has brought us heaven’s choices; heavenly music, let it ring.
Alleluia! Alleluia! Easter people, let us sing.

Processional Hymn 207    Jesus Christ is risen today   Easter Hymn

Song of Praise 417    This is the feast   Festival Canticle

Sequence Hymn 199   Come, ye faithful, raise the strain     St. Kevin

Offertory Anthem    Offertory Anthem    Hallelujah from Messiah   Georg Frideric Handel (1685-1759)

Hallelujah! For the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.
The kingdom of this world is become the kingdom of our Lord, and of His Christ,
And He shall reign forever and ever, King of kings, and Lord of lords.

Sanctus S125   Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Fraction Anthem   Christ our Passover    Jeffrey Rickard (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem     Alleluia    Randall Thompson (1899-1984)

Communion Hymn 305   Come, risen Lord   Rosedale

Closing Hymn 210   The day of resurrection   Ellacombe

Voluntary    Toccata (Symphonie V)    Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)

Music: The St. John’s Adult Choir (8:00), The Saint John’s Youth and Adult Choirs (10:30)
Organist/Choirmaster: Scott Lamlein
Assisting Organist/Choirmaster: David Chrzanowski
Trumpeters: Tom Hintz, Jeff Higgins
Timpani: Bill Solomon

March 30, 2018 + Good Friday

Good Friday Spoken Liturgy at 7:00 a.m., St. John’s.
Good Friday Liturgy with Hymns at noon, St. James’s.

Good Friday Liturgy at 7:00 p.m., sung by the combined Youth and Adult Choirs of St. James’s and St. Johns, and messages by the clergy of both parishes, at St. John’s.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Service Music:

Organ Voluntary    Choral Dorien    Jehan Alain (1911-1940)

Hymns:

474   When I survey the wondrous cross   Rockingham

458   My song is love unknown    Love unknown

172 Were you there when they crucified my Lord    Were You There

Anthem     Greater love hath no man     John Ireland (1879-1962)
Words: Song of Solomon 8:7,6; John 15:13; 1 Peter 2:24; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Peter 2:9; Romans 12:1

Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it. Love is strong as death. Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness. Ye are washed, ye are sanctified, ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus; Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. I beseech you, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.

Anthem     Salvator mundi    Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)
Words from the Sarum Manual

Salvator mundi, salva nos, qui per crucem et sanguinem
redemisti nos. Auxiliare nobis, te deprecamur, Deus noster.

Saviour of the world, save us, thou who by thy cross and blood
hast redeemed us. Come to our rescue, we beseech thee, our God.

March 29, 2018 + Maundy Thursday

Maundy Thursday Eucharist and Footwashing at 7:00 sung by the Youth Choir, sermon by the Rev’d William Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Service Music:

Voluntary    O sacred head, sore wounded    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Kyrie Eleison S-84   Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 325   Let us break bread together on our knees    Let us break bread

Song at the Maundy    Ubi caritas    Jacques Berthier (1923-1994)
Norb Spencer, accordion

Offertory Anthem    Pie Jesu from Requiem    Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)

Pie Jesu, Domine, dona eis requiem.
Dona eis requiem sempiternam requiem.

Merciful Jesus, Lord, grant them rest.
Grant them rest, eternal rest.

Sanctus    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Agnus Dei    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Hymn 315    Thou, who at thy first Eucharist didst pray   Song 1

Psalm 22    Plainsong Chant
Britt Emerick and Scott Lamlein, soloists

March 25, 2018 + Sunday of the Passion – Palm Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Palm Procession from the Cloister Garden

Hymn in Procession 154    All glory, laud, and honor    Valet will ich dir geben

Kyrie Eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 158    Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended     Herzliebster Jesu
Sung in unison; men sing verse 2, women sing verse 3, all sing remaining verses.

Offertory Anthem      Sanctus from Requiem    Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)
Heidi Tummescheit, violin

In the Sanctus Fauré offers something like a vision of the Kingdom of Heaven itself. Over an almost minimalist harp-and-string figure (perhaps representing the clouds themselves?) and a high solo violin, the sopranos and high men play duetting choirs of angels, calling and responding and slowly building to the triumphant Hosanna. 

Sanctus    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Agnus Dei    Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem     Salvator mundi    Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)
Words from the Sarum Manual

Salvator mundi, salva nos, qui per crucem et sanguinem
redemisti nos. Auxiliare nobis, te deprecamur, Deus noster.

Saviour of the world, save us, thou who by thy cross and blood
hast redeemed us. Come to our rescue, we beseech thee, our God.

Salvator mundi has a personal text (“Saviour, help us, redeem us!”) but it still inhabits a spiritual realm. English Renaissance composers enjoyed a certain musical technique called cross-relationships (for example, a G-natural and a G-sharp sung at the same time.) Tallis employs that “crunching sound” frequently here to establish the poignant pleading of the text.

Hymn in Procession 168    O sacred head, sore wounded    Passion Chorale

March 18, 2018 + The Fifth Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    O man, bewail thy grievous sin, BWV 622    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 170    To mock your reign, O dearest Lord    The Third Tune

Offertory Anthem    Create in me a clean heart, O God     Carl Mueller (1892-1982)
Words: Psalm 50:10–13

Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.
Cast me not away from thy presence and take not thy Holy Spirit from me.
Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation and uphold me, uphold me with thy free Spirit.
Then will I teach transgressors thy ways, and sinners will be converted unto thee.
Create in me a clean heart, O God.

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem     When rooks fly homeward     Arthur Baynon (1889-1954)
Words: Joseph Campbell (1879-1944)

When rooks fly homeward
And shadows fall,
When roses fold
On the hay-yard wall,
When blind moths flutter
By door and tree,
Then comes the quiet
Of Christ to me.

When stars look out
On the Children’s Path,
And grey mists gather
On carn and rath*,
When night is one
With the brooding sea,
Then comes the quiet
Of Christ to me.

Arthur Baynon worked mostly as a teacher, serving as music master and organist at St. Michael’s College, then known for its focus on Anglican church music, in Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire from 1913 to 1916. From 1920 he directed the music at Caterham School, a boarding school south of London. He was also the organist, a position that traditionally includes the training of the choir, at St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church in nearby Croydon. Baynon composed songs for voice and piano, choral works, and music for organ. 

* carn = cairn, a pile of stones constructed as a landmark or monument
   rath = round, or ringfort, an ancient circular earthen fortification

Closing Hymn in Procession 473    Lift high the cross, the love of Christ proclaim    Crucifer

Voluntary    Fugue from Sonata VI     Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

March 11, 2018 + The Fourth Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Subscribe to St. John’s podcasts at PodcastPeople or on iTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    By the waters of Babylon, BWV 563b    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 671    Amazing grace! how sweet the sound    New Britain

With the message that forgiveness and redemption are possible regardless of sins committed and that the soul can be delivered from despair through the mercy of God, Amazing Grace is one of the most recognizable songs in the English-speaking world. Its writer, John Newton, wrote the text out of personal experience: After being been forced into service in the English Royal Navy, Newton found work in the slave trade. A huge storm battered his trade ship in 1779, and in his despair Newton had a profound conversion experience, and wrote the now-famous hymn as soon as he reached shore. He later dedicated his life to Christian theology. 

Offertory Anthem     Greater love hath no man     John Ireland (1879-1962)
Words: Song of Solomon 8:7,6; John 15:13; 1 Peter 2:24; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Peter 2:9; Romans 12:1
Claudia Ayer, soprano; John Nowacki, baritone

Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it. Love is strong as death. Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness. Ye are washed, ye are sanctified, ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus; Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. I beseech you, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem    God so loved the world    John Stainer (1840-1901)
Words: John 3:16-17

God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son; that whoso believe in him should not perish but have everlasting life. For God sent not his son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through him might be saved.

The short text of God so loved the world is so well-known because it explains the whole Easter story, encapsulating the essence of the Christian Gospel in under 30 words. John Stainer’s choral setting of the text is a standard of the choral repertoire, and part of a larger work, The Crucifixion, that was written as a meditation to aid in the understanding of the passion and death of Christ. The work is still performed annually at St. Marylebone in London, which commissioned it in 1887.

Closing Hymn in Procession 690    Guide me, O thou great Jehovah    Cwm Rhondda

Voluntary   Prelude in F minor, BWV 534     J. S. Bach

Assisting Organist: Christa Rakich

March 4, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the webcast recording will include the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation.

 

March 4, 2018 + The Third Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Play Audio
Full Service Audio
Play Audio

All Podcasts: Podcast PeopleiTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Partite Diverse: Christ der du bist der helle Tag, BWV 766    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Christ, you are the light of day

Unlike the “partitas” of Bach and others, the “partite diverse” is a set of variation on a chorale tune. This set of variations, written in Bach’s youth, is a beautiful, colorful reminder of the light of Christ – always in our lives, even in darkness.

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 676    There is a balm in Gilead    Balm in Gilead

Offertory Anthem    Libera me from Requiem    Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)
Nicholas Filippides, baritone

Libera me, Domine, de morte aeterna in die illa tremenda
Quando coeli movendi sunt et terra
Dum veneris judicare saeculum per ignem
Tremens factus sum ego et timeo
dum discussio venerit atque ventura ira
Dies illa dies irae
calamitatis et miseriae
dies illa, dies magna
et amara valde
Requiem aeternam dona eis Domine
et lux perpetua luceat eis.

Deliver me, o Lord, from everlasting death on that dreadful day
when the heavens and the earth shall be moved
when thou shalt come to judge the world by fire.
I quake with fear and I tremble
awaiting the day of account and the wrath to come.
That day, the day of anger,
of calamity, of misery,
that day, the great day,
and most bitter.
Grant them eternal rest, O Lord,
and may perpetual light shine upon them.

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem    A new heaven from Visions    John Rutter, 2016
Words from Revelation 21

I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem. Hosannah, hosannah!
And the city was pure gold, like unto clear glass.
And I say no temple therein:
for the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the temple of it.
And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it:
For the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.

John Rutter writes: Visions was the result of a most unusual invitation: to write a piece combining solo violin, string ensemble (to which I added a harp), and the boy choristers of the Temple Church choir. Having immediately decided to accept, my thoughts soon turned to the historic associations of the Temple Church with the Knights Templar—the church takes its name from the Temple at Jerusalem, and the round shape of its most ancient part is a deliberate echo of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. ‘Jerusalem’ is of course more than the name of a middle-eastern city: it stands as a symbol both of God’s people and of a utopian ideal of heavenly peace and seraphic bliss in store for redeemed humanity. 

Closing Hymn in Procession 574    Before thy throne, O God, we kneel    St. Petersburg

Voluntary   Final Variation: Christ der du bist der helle Tag, BWV 766    J. S. Bach

February 25, 2018 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the St. John’s Schola.

Click here for details.

 

February 25, 2018 + The Second Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d William Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Play Audio
Full Service Audio
Play Audio

All Podcasts: Podcast PeopleiTunes

Service Music:

Voluntary    Two Pieces    Jehan Alain (1911-1940)
Monodie – Choral cistercien pour une élévation

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Sequence Hymn 455    O Love of God, how strong and true    Dunedin

Offertory Anthem    Introit and Kyrie from Requiem    Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)
Words: from Missa pro defunctis

Requiem aeternam dona eis Domine: et lux perpetua luceat eis.
Te decet in hymnus, Deus in Sion: et tibi reddetur votum in Jerusalem.
Exaudi orationem meam, ad te omnis caro veniet.
Kyrie eleison. Christe eleison. Kyrie eleison.

Grant them rest eternal, Lord our God, we pray to thee:
and light perpetual shine on them for ever.
Thou, Lord, art worshipped in Sion; thy praises shall ever be sung in all Jerusalem.
Lord have mercy. Christ have mercy. Lord have mercy.
O hear us; O Lord God, hear thy faithful servants’ prayer; to thee shall all mortal flesh return.

Fauré wrote of the work, “Everything I managed to entertain by way of religious illusion I put into my Requiem, which moreover is dominated from beginning to end by a very human feeling of faith in eternal rest.” The opening of the Introit resembles in some ways the choral opening of the Brahms Requiem, entering in unaccompanied chords. But for Fauré, there is a different set of emphases: he contrasts the piano requiem (rest) with the forte luceat (light). Then he introduces two chant-inspired tunes, one sung by the tenors and the Te decet tune, sung by the sopranos. The choir then pleads for attention to its prayer, and the Kyrie setting, a remarkably short one, derives from the Requiem aeternam chant tune. 

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem   Offertory from Requiem    Gabriel Fauré
Nicholas Filippides, baritone

O Domine, Jesu Christe, Rex Gloriae
libera animas defunctorum
de poenis inferni et de profundo lacu.
O Domine, Jesu Christe, Rex Gloriae
libera animas defunctorum de ore leonis
ne absorbeat eus Tartarus ne cadant in obscurum
Hostias et preces tibi Domine, laudis offerimus
tu suscipe pro animabus illis
quarum hodie memoriam facimus
Fac eas, Domine, de morte transire ad vitam
Quam olim Abrahae promisisti et semini eus.

Lord Jesus Christ, King of glory,
deliver the souls of all the faithful departed from the pains of hells and from the bottomless pit.
Lord Jesus Christ, King of glory,
Deliver them from the lion’s mouth,
nor let them fall into darkness,
neither the black abyss swallow them up.
We offer unto Thee this sacrifice of prayer and praise
Receive it for those souls
whom today we commemorate.
Allow them, o Lord, to cross from death into the life which once Thou didst promise to Abraham and his seed.

This setting is in a sort of ABA format, beginning and ending with an eerie chant-like tune set in canon, with one voice mirroring and following another. Between these two segments is the baritone solo, based on the Hostias text. Listen for the accompaniment, which inserts the Te decet tune in right before the baritone sings fac eas, Domine. And observe how the accompaniment turns the wavering accompaniment of the somber introduction into something different entirely under the baritone soloist.

Closing Hymn in Procession 401    The God of Abraham praise    Leoni

Voluntary    Fugue sur le thème du Carillon des Heures de la cathédral de Soissons    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

February 18, 2018 + The First Sunday in Lent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Service Music:

Voluntary  Prelude and Fugue in E minor, BWV 555    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Kyrie eleison S-84    Gregorian Chant, Orbis factor

Lent brings us an opportunity for deeper reflection, as we take a break from musical fanfares and descants, and replace them with a silent procession and meditative chant. The service music that we will sing during Lent is all from the Gregorian Missal; both the Sanctus and Agnus Dei were famously set in Maurice Duruflé’s Requiem.

Sequence Hymn 121    Christ, when for us you were baptized    Caithness

Offertory Anthem    O for a closer walk with God     Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
Words: William Cowper (1731-1800), found at Hymn 683

Sanctus     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Fraction Anthem     Agnus Dei     Gregorian Chant, Deus Genitor alme

Communion Anthem    Teach me, O Lord    Thomas Attwood (1765-1838)
Words: Psalm 119: 33

Teach me, O Lord, the way of thy statutes; and I shall keep it unto the end.

Closing Hymn in Procession 143    The glory of these forty days    St. Flavian

Voluntary    Prelude in E minor, BWV 533    Johann Sebastian Bach

Ash Wednesday + February 14, 2018

Imposition of Ashes at 7:00 p.m. with hymns and organ music, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Service Music:

Voluntary    Antiphon    Marcel Dupré (1886-1971)

Hymn 142    Lord, who throughout these forty days    St. Flavian

Hymn 674    Forgive our sins as we forgive    Detroit

 

February 11, 2018 + The Last Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Prelude and Fugue in C Major, BWV 547     Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Préambule    Louis Vierne (1870-1937)

This tremendous work is an example of Bach’s use of concentrated material within a piece of music. The entire musical fabric of the Prelude is presented in the first eight measures. The rest of the prelude explores various combinations of this material in a number of keys, often in quick succession. 

Processional Hymn 427    When morning gilds the skies    Laudes Domini

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 137    O wondrous type! O vision fair    Wareham

Offertory Anthem    Heilig (Holy)    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
Words: Sanctus from the liturgy of the Eucharist

Heilig, heilig, heilig ist Gott, der Herr Zebaoth!
Alle Lande sind seiner Ehre voll.
Hosianna in der Höh’!
Gelobt sei, der da kommt im Namen des Herrn!
Hosianna in der Höh’!

Holy, holy, holy is God, the Lord Sabaoth!
Ev’ry nation proclaims his glorious praise.
Sing Hosanna in the heights.
O blest is he that comes in God’s holy name.
Sing Hosanna in the heights.

The posthumously published Three Sacred Pieces were composed towards the end of 1846. Mendelssohn was never physically the most robust of men, and the years of constant traveling, performing, composing and conducting were now taking their toll on his fragile frame—he was to pass away the following year, completely burnt out. His letters of the period are brimful of references to his state of exhaustion, and by the time he came to compose these short choral works, he had already begun pulling out of upcoming performances. This perfectly conceived miniature is typical both in terms of its sheer mastery of choral writing and effortless command of musical expression and structure.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem    My God, how wonderful thou art   Richard Scarth, 1983
Words: Frederick Faber (1814-1863)

My God, how wonderful Thou art,
Thy majesty how bright,
How beautiful Thy mercy seat,
In depths of burning light!

How wonderful, how beautiful,
The sight of Thee must be,
Thine endless wisdom, boundless pow’r,
And awesome purity!

Father of Jesus, love’s reward,
What rapture will it be,
Prostrate before Thy throne to lie,
And ever gaze on Thee!

Closing Hymn in Procession 460    Alleluia! sing to Jesus!    Hyfrydol

Voluntary    Fanfare    John Cook (1918-1984)

A trumpet mardi gras for organ! This is the last time we’ll hear the Trompette-en-Chamade (horizontal trumpet over the main entrance) and Trompette Harmonique (high pressure trumpet in the chancel) in worship until Easter Sunday, as Lent begins this coming week. 

February 4, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

Note that the recording includes the full service, which includes lengthy periods of silence. You can use that time for personal meditation, or use the fast-forward feature to move ahead.

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The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation

 

February 4, 2018 + The Fifth Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by Walter McKenney.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

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Service Music:

Voluntary     Aria    Flor Peeters (1903-1986)

Processional Hymn 135    Songs of thankfulness and praise    Salzburg

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 529    In Christ there is no East or West    McKee

Offertory Anthem    Come, renew us     Eleanor Daley (b. 1955)
Words: David Adam

Come, Lord, come to us. Enter our darkness with your light,
Fill our emptiness with your presence,
Come, refresh, restore, renew us.
In our sadness come as joy, in our troubles, come as peace,
In our fearfulness, come as hope, in our darkness, come as light,
In our frailty, come as strength, in our loneliness, come as love,
Come, refresh, restore, renew us.

Eleanor Daley is a Canadian composer, performer, and accompanist. She received her Bachelor of Music Degree in Organ Performance from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and holds diplomas in both organ and piano from the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and Trinity College in England. She has been the Director of Music at Fairlawn Heights United Church in Toronto since 1982. During that time she has established a thriving choral program for which much of her choral music has been composed. This lovely anthem was commissioned for Christ Church, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Stuart Forster, Director of Music and Organist, in celebration of the 250th anniversary of the Dedication of the Church, 2011.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet    O sacrum convivium    Alan MacMillan, 1995
Words: attrib. St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)

O sacrum convivium,
In quo Christus sumitur,
Recolitur memoria passionis eius;
Mens impletur gratia,
Et futurae gloriae, nobis pignus datur.
Alleluia.

O sacred banquet,
in which Christ is received,
the memory of His Passion is renewed,
the mind is filled with grace,
and a pledge of future glory is given us.
Alleluia.

Connecticut composer and friend of St. John’s Alan MacMillan uses supple melodic lines and harmonies to color his setting of this Eucharistic text. The organ part reflects the contemporary French school of chant accompaniment with both sustained, quasi-impressionistic harmonies and use of quiet solo stops.

Closing Hymn in Procession 423    Immortal, invisible, God only wise    St. Denio

Voluntary    Gloria from Organoedia ad missam lectam    Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967)

January 28, 2018 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the Choir School of Hartford and the Choirs of Trinity Church.

Click here for details.

 

January 28, 2018 + The Fourth Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Short Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 557     Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn 535    Ye servant of God, your Master proclaim    Paderborn

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 339    Deck thyself, my soul, with gladness    Schmücke dich

Offertory Anthem    Maria, mater gratiae    Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)
Words: Cantus diversi in honorem Blessed Virgin Mary

Maria, Mater gratiae, dulcis Parens clementiae, tu nos ab hoste protege, et mortis hora suscipe. Jesu, tibi sit gloria, qui natus es de Virgine, cum Patre et almo Spiritu, in sempiterna saecula. Amen.

Mary gracious mother, sweet fount of mercy, protect us from the foe and receive us in our hour of death. Jesu, born of the Virgin, glory be to thee with the Father and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever. Amen.

French composer, Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924), is regarded as one of the greatest masters of art song. His contribution to the genre has impacted countless other artists in the twentieth century. As a composer of sacred music, Fauré’s output is significantly smaller, totaling only eight opuses, among them the popular Requiem, Op. 48, which our choirs will perform in concert on March 11. Fauré wrote Maria, mater gratiae in close proximity to the Requiem – during a somewhat turbulent time in his life. Between the ages and thirty-five and forty-five, Fauré struggled with depression. Although he enjoyed a rather successful career, a broken engagement caused his personal life to become unstable, ultimately impacting his output as a composer. In this sense, Maria, Mater gratiae belongs to the late part of Fauré’s ‘melancholy’ decade – a time during which the composer was coming out of the dark period in his life.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem    Prayer of St. Richard of Chichester    Louie L. White (1921-1979)

O holy Jesus,
Most merciful redeemer,
Friend and brother,
May I know thee more clearly,
Love thee more dearly,
And follow thee more nearly.

Born to a noble family in the late 12th century, Richard of Chichester was educated at Oxford, and during a life worthy of canonization, was appointed Chancellor of Oxford University.  Later becoming a priest, he lived a life of simple vegetarian frugality, and as Bishop of Chichester, Richard was instrumental in major reform to the manners and morals of his clergy.  Canonized in 1262, his shrine eventually became so popular that King Henry VIII ordered it destroyed. On his deathbed in 1253, Richard is believed to have uttered a prayer containing these words. 

Closing Hymn in Procession 438    Tell out, my soul, the greatness of the Lord    Woodlands

Voluntary    Trumpet Tune in D    John Stanley (1713-1786)

January 21, 2018 + The Third Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by Michael Corey.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Introitus and Kyrie from Organoedia ad missam lectam    Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967)

The organ prelude and postlude are by Zoltán Kodály, who revolutionized the method by which we teach music theory and especially ear training to students of music. Though most of his music is based in the hungarian folk tradition, this organ mass is in a late romantic style, with many moods and dramatic tone painting. This work was later transformed into a Missa Brevis for choir, organ, and orchestra.

Processional Hymn 381    Thy strong word did cleave the darkness    Ton-y-Botel

Sequence Hymn 550    Jesus calls us; o’er the tumult    Restoration

Offertory Anthem    Dear Lord and father of mankind     Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (1848-1918)
Words by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), found at Hymn 652

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Motet    Ave verum corpus   Stephanie Martin (b. 1962)
Words attributed to Pope Innocent VI (d. 1362)

Ave, verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine, vere passum immolatum in Cruce pro homine,
Cujus latus perforatum unda fluxit sanguine, esto nobis praegustatum in mortis examine.

Hail, true body born of the Virgin Mary, who truly suffered, sacrificed on the Cross for man,
Whose pierced side overflowed with blood, Be for us a foretaste in the test of death.

Composer, teacher, performer and church musician, Stephanie Martin has contributed to the Toronto’s colorful music scene for 25 years.  As Artistic Director of Pax Christi Chorale since 1996, Martin has led this 85-voice choral group in memorable performances of the great works of the Oratorio repertoire. Recently in Vancouver, she received an honorary membership in the Elgar Society, and holds the distinction of being the first Canadian woman to conduct a full performance of Elgar’s Dream of Gerontius

Closing Hymn in Procession 539    O Zion haste, thy mission high fulfilling    Tidings

Voluntary   Ite, missa est from Organoedia ad missam lectam    Zoltán Kodály

January 14, 2018 + The Second Sunday after Epiphany: Jazz Eucharist

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs with the Hot Cat Jazz Band, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Hymns by the Hot Cat Jazz Band
We’ll understand it better by and by
Come Sunday
Let us break bread together

By now you have noticed that things are a little different this morning! Our music today is led by the Hot Cat Jazz Band, a local Dixieland-style band that specializes in Jazz Worship – they do many of these services throughout Connecticut every year. The service music responses continue to be our traditional music with organ to provide an anchor in our traditional worship style; but everything else, including and especially the hymns, are a time for you to tap your toes, move about, and sing praise with freedom and joy. Don’t be afraid – join in and sing loudly!

Processional Hymn    Shall we gather at the river    At the River

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn    Swing low, sweet chariot    Swing Low

Offertory Anthem    What a friend we have in Jesus    Harold M. Best, 1985
Words: Joseph Scriven (1819-1866), found at hymn 109.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem   Agnus Dei (from A Little Jazz Mass)    Bob Chilcott (b. 1955)
Latin words from the Eucharist liturgy, at the Breaking of the Bread.

Closing Hymn in Procession    Take my hand, precious Lord     Precious Lord

Voluntary    When the saints go marching in

The Hot Cat Jazz Band:
Trumpet: Ross Tucker
Clarinet: Andy Sherwood
Trombone: Tom Boates
Guitar: Norman Johnson
Bass: Donn Doucette
Drums: Sal Ranniello

January 7, 2018 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation

 

January 7, 2018 + The First Sunday after Epiphany

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs, sermon by the Rev’d Bill Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Go, tell it on the mountain    Robert Powell (b. 1932)
Prelude on Cranham    Malcolm Archer (b. 1952)

Processional Hymn 119    As with gladness men of old     Dix

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 112    In the bleak midwinter    Cranham

Offertory Anthem    Behold a star from Jacob shining, from Christus       Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
Words: Based upon Numbers 24:17

Behold a star from Jacob shining,
And a scepter from Israel rising,
To reign in glory over the nations.

Like some bright morning star is he,
The promise of the coming day,
Beyond the night of sorrow.

Break forth, O Light!
We, our joyful hearts uplifting with thanksgiving,
Hail the brightness of Thy rising.

Underscoring the chorus with an undulating accompaniment of triplets in the strings, Mendelssohn developed his music with extended, imitative lines and the chorus singing “Behold a star from Jacob shining.” A dramatic chordal section highlights a royal metaphor for Christ “reigning in glory over the nations.” And the chorale tune: Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, (How Brightly Shines the Morning Star), by Philipp Nicolai, 1597, a well-known German Christmas chorale, brings the chorus to a conclusion.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem    Saw you never in the twilight    Harold Friedell (1905-1958)
Words by Cecil Frances Alexander (1818-1895)

Saw you never, in the twilight,
when the sun had left the skies,
up in heav’n the clear stars shining
through the gloom, like silver eyes?
So of old the wise men, watching,
saw a little stranger star,
and they knew the King was given,
and they followed it from far.

Know ye not that lowly baby
was the bright and morning Star?
He who came to light the Gentiles
and the darkened isles afar?
And we, too, may seek his cradle;
there our hearts’ best treasures bring;
love and faith and true devotion
for our Savior, God, and King.

Closing Hymn in Procession 616    Hail to the Lord’s Anointed    Es flog ein keins Waldvogelein

Voluntary    Choral Song    Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)

Assisting Organist: David Chrzanowski

December 31, 2017 + The First Sunday after Christmas

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. with hymns, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Service Music:

Voluntary    Three chorale variations on Vom Himmel hoch     Ernst Pepping (1901-1981)
Allegretto cantabile; Scherzando; Pastorale

Opening Hymn 98    Unto us a boy is born!    Puer nobis nascitur

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 82    Of the Father’s love begotten    Divinum mysterium

Offertory   Musette from Pastorale, BWV 590    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Closing Hymn 115    What chid is this, who, laid to rest    Greensleeves

Voluntary    The old year has passed away    Johann Sebastian Bach

Guest Organist: Douglas Johnson

December 25, 2017 + Christmas Day

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:00 a.m. with congregational carols, sermon by the Rev’d Hope Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here: Service BulletinSermon Text

Service Music:

Voluntary     The shepherds from Nativity Suite    Wilbur Held (1914-2015)

Opening Hymn 96   Angels we have heard on high    Gloria

Sequence Hymn 79    O Little town of Bethlehem    St. Louis

Offertory    The magi from Nativity Suite    Wilbur Held

Closing Hymn 100    Joy to the world!     Antioch

Voluntary    Joy to the world from Nativity Suite    Wilbur Held

December 24, 2017 + Christmas Eve

Service Schedule:

3:50 p.m.  Choral Prelude (Youth Choir)

4:00 p.m. Family Eucharist sung by the Youth Choir

10:30 p.m. Choral Prelude (Adult Choir) with harp

11:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist sung by the Adult Choir with harp

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin 4 p.m.Service Bulletin 11 p.m.Sermon Text

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Service Music:

Choral Prelude at 3:50 p.m. with the St. John’s Youth and Alumnae Choir

Hymn 102    Once in Royal David’s city    Irby
Stanzas 1 & 2, choir; stanzas 3-6, congregation
Teddy Babbitt, soloist

Torches      John Joubert (b. 1927)
Translation from the Galician by John Brande Trend (1887-1958)

Torches, torches, run with torches All the way to Bethlehem!
Christ is born and now lies sleeping; Come and sing your song to him!
Ah, Roro (‘Little King’), Roro, my baby, Ah, Roro, my love, Roro;
Sleep you well, my heart’s own darling, While we sing you our Roro.
Sing, my friends, and make you merry, Joy and mirth and joy again;
Lo, he lives, the King of heaven, Now and evermore. Amen.

O holy night      Adolphe Adam (1803-1856)
Words: Adapted from the French by John Sullivan Dwight (1812-1893)
Britt Emerick, soloist

O holy night! the stars are brightly shining
It is the night of the dear Savior’s birth;
Long lay the world in sin and error pining,
‘Till he appeared, and the soul felt its worth.
A thrill of hope, the weary world rejoices,
For yonder breaks a new and glorious morn!
Fall on your knees! Oh, hear the angel-voices!
O night divine! O night when Christ was born!

Truly he taught us to love one another
His law is love, and his gospel is peace.
Chains shall he break, for the slave is our brother,
And in his name all oppression shall cease.
Sweet hymns of joy in grateful chorus raise we,
Let all within us praise his holy name.
He knows our need, he guardeth us from danger;
Behold your King! before the Lowly bend!

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 4:00 p.m. sung by the Youth and Alumnae Choir; sermon by The Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Processional Hymn 83    O come, all ye faithful    Adeste fideles, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 115    What child is this   Greensleeves

Offertory Anthem     Nativity carol    words and music by John Rutter (b. 1945)

Born in a stable so bare,
Born so long ago;
Born ‘neath light of star
He who loved us so.

Wise men from distant far land,
Shepherds from starry hills
Worship this babe so rare,
Hearts with his warmth he fills.

Cradled by mother so fair,
Tender her lullaby;
Over her son so dear
Angel hosts fill the sky.

Far away silent he lay,
Born today, your homage pay,
For Christ is born for aye,
Born on Christmas Day.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem   No small wonder    Paul Edwards (b. 1955)
Text: Paul Wigmore

Small wonder the star,
Small wonder the light,
The angels in chorus,
The shepherds in fright;
But stable and manger for God –
No small wonder!

Small wonder the kings,
Small wonder they bore
The gold and the incense,
The myrrh, to adore:
But God gives his life on a cross –
No small wonder!

Small wonder the love,
Small wonder the grace,
The power, the glory,
The light of his face;
But all to redeem my poor heart –
No small wonder!

Communion Hymn 101    Away in a manger   Cradle Song

Post-communion Hymn 111     Silent night     Stille nacht

Closing Hymn 87     Hark the herald angels sing     Mendelssohn, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Voluntary    In dulci jubilo (In quiet joy)    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

+   +   +   +   +

Choral Prelude at 10:30 p.m. with the St. John’s Adult Choir and Olivia Fortunato, harp

Bring a Torch Jeannette Isabella    French Carol, arr. Dewey Owens (1925-2006)

Ave Maria, David Conte (b. 1955)

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum.
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
Benedicta tu in mulieribus,
Blessed art thou among women,
et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus.
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Sancta Maria, Mater Dei,
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
ora pro nobis peccatoribus,
pray for us sinners,
nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

I wonder as I wander     Carl Rütti, 2001
Words: John Jacob Niles (1892-1980)

I wonder as I wander out under the sky
How Jesus the Saviour did come for to die
For poor on’ry people like you and like I;
I wonder as I wander out under the sky

When Mary birthed Jesus ’twas in a cow’s stall
With wise men and farmers and shepherds and all
But high from God’s heaven, a star’s light did fall
And the promise of ages it then did recall.

If Jesus had wanted for any wee thing
A star in the sky or a bird on the wing
Or all of God’s Angels in heaven to sing
He surely could have it, ’cause he was the King

There is no rose from A Ceremony of Carols    Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
Words: Anonymous, 14th century

There is no rose of such virtue
As is the rose that bare Jesu;
Alleluia.

For in this rose contained was
Heaven and earth in little space;
Res miranda.  (Thing of wonder)

By that rose we may well see
There be one God in persons three,
Paresforma.  (Equal in form)

The angels sungen the shepherds to:
Gloria in excelsis deo:  (Glory to God in the highest)
Gaudeamus.   (Let us rejoice)

Leave we all this worldly mirth,
And follow we this joyful birth;
Transeamus.  (Let us follow)

Interlude from A Ceremony of Carols     Benjamin Britten

Away in a manger    English Carol, arr. John Rutter (b. 1945)
Words found at Hymn 101.

My Lord has come    Will Todd, 2010
Words by the composer

Shepherds, called by angels, called by love and angels:
No place for them but a stable.
My Lord has come.
Sages, searching for stars, searching for love in heaven;
No place for them but a stable.
My Lord has come.
His love will hold me, his love will cherish me, love will cradle me.
Lead me, lead me to see him, sages and shepherds and angels;
No place for me but a stable.
My Lord has come.

O come, O come, Emmanuel    13th Century Plainsong, arr. Dewey Owens

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 11:00 p.m. sung by the Adult choir with harp and organ; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Processional Hymn 83    O come, all ye faithful    Adeste fideles, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Gloria S280     Robert Powell (b.1932)

Sequence Hymn 115    What child is this   Greensleeves

Offertory Anthem   Hodie Christus natus est     Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562-1621)

Hodie Christus natus est:
Hodie Salvator apparuit:
Hodie in terra canunt Angeli,
laetantur Archangeli
Hodie exsultant justi, dicentes:
Gloria in excelsis Deo.

Today Christ is born:
Today the Savior appears:
Today the angels sing on earth,
and the Archangels rejoice.
Today the just exult, saying:
Glory to God in the highest.

Sanctus  S130    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Fraction anthem S164    Jesus, lamb of God     Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem   In dulci jubilo (1837)    Robert Pearsall (1795-1856)
Words: Heinrich Seuse, c. 1328, translated Pearsall

In dulci jubilo, (In sweet rejoicing,)
Let us our homage show!
Our heart’s joy reclineth
In praesepio; (in the manger;)
And like a bright star shineth
Matris in gremio. (in the mother’s lap.)
Alpha es et O! (You are the Alpha and Omega!)

O Jesu parvule, (O tiny Jesus)
I yearn for thee alway!
Hear me, I beseech thee,
O puer optime; (O best of children)
My prayer let it reach thee,
O princeps gloriae. (O prince of glory)
Trahe me post te. (Make me follow you)

O patris caritas! (O love of the Father)
O Nati lenitas! (O gentleness of the Son)
Deeply were we stained.
Per nostra crimina: (through our crimes)
But thou hast for us gained
Coelorum gaudia, (the joys of heaven)
O that we were there!

Ubi sunt gaudia, (where are joys)
Where, if that they be not there?
There are angels singing
Nova cantica; (new songs)
There the bells are ringing
In Regis curia (in the courts of the King).
O that we were there!

Communion Hymn 101    Away in a manger   Cradle Song

Postcommunion Hymn 111    Silent night    Stille nacht, st. 3 arr. Wolfgang Lindner

Closing Hymn 87    Hark the herald angels sing    Mendelssohn, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Voluntary    In dulci jubilo (In quiet joy)    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

December 24, 2017 + The Fourth Sunday of Advent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. with hymns; sermon by The Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary   Wake, awake! For night is flying    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Opening Hymn 66    Come, thou long expected Jesus    Stuttgart

Kyrie Eleison   from Litany of the Saints    adapt. Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Sequence Hymn 264    The Word whom earth and sea and sky    Song 34

Offertory Music    Pastorale on Forest Green    Richard Purvis (1917-1992)

Sanctus   from Missa Emmanuel    Richard Proulx

Fraction Anthem    Agnus Dei   from Missa Emmanuel    Richard Proulx

Closing Hymn 78    O little town of Bethlehem    Forest Green

Voluntary   Fantasy on Veni Emmanuel    Wilbur Held (1914-2015)

Tuesday, December 19, 2017, 6:00 p.m. + Stop, Rest Pray: A Time for Advent Reflection and Meditation

Join us for a half-hour service of prayer, scripture, reflection, silence, and chant.

Worship at Home:

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December 17, 2017 + The Third Sunday of Advent – Christmas Pageant

The St. John’s Christmas Pageant at 10:30 a.m., sung by the Adult and Youth Choirs, with Jeffrey Higgins and Thomas Hintz, trumpets

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Organ Voluntary: Noel grand jeu et duo, Louis-Claude Daquin (1694-1772)

Choral Introit Ave Maria, David Conte (b. 1955)

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum.
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
Benedicta tu in mulieribus,
Blessed art thou among women,
et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus.
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Sancta Maria, Mater Dei,
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
ora pro nobis peccatoribus,
pray for us sinners,
nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

Traditional Carols with brass, choir, and organ.

Anthem: Away in a manger, English Carol, arr. John Rutter (b. 1945)
Words found at Hymn 101.

Offertory Music: Rigoudon from Idomenée, André Campra (1660-1744)

Voluntary: My spirit be joyful from Cantata 146, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
arr. E. Power Biggs

Tuesday, December 12, 2017, 6:00 p.m. + Stop, Rest Pray: A Time for Advent Reflection and Meditation

Join us for a half-hour service of prayer, scripture, reflection, silence, and chant.

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December 10, 2017 + Candlelight Festival of Lessons and Carols

Candlelight Festival of Lessons and Carols at 3:00 p.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs, with guest organist Floyd Higgins.

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December 10, 2017 + The Second Sunday of Advent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir; sermon by The Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary    Trio: From heaven above to earth I come     Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)
Reflection on Richmond     June Nixon, 2015

Processional Hymn 76    On Jordan’s bank the Baptist’s cry    Winchester New

Kyrie Eleison   from Litany of the Saints    adapt. Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Sequence Hymn WLP 724    People, look East    Besançon Carol

Offertory Anthem   There is no rose (from A Ceremony of Carols)    Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
Words: Anonymous, 14th century

There is no rose of such virtue
As is the rose that bare Jesu;
Alleluia.

For in this rose contained was
Heaven and earth in little space;
Res miranda.  (Thing of wonder)

By that rose we may well see
There be one God in persons three,
Paresforma.  (Equal in form)

The angels sungen the shepherds to:
Gloria in excelsis deo:  (Glory to God in the highest)
Gaudeamus.   (Let us rejoice)

Leave we all this worldly mirth,
And follow we this joyful birth;
Transeamus.  (Let us follow)

A Ceremony of Carols was written in 1942 when the English composer Benjamin Britten was 29 years old. It is one of the composer’s most popular and widely performed works, particularly at the Christmas season. A Ceremony of Carols was composed in part during five weeks that Britten spent travelling by ship from New York to England during the Second World War. During the voyage the ship stopped in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where Britten purchased a book of medieval poetry. Poems from this book, along with Gregorian Chant and other poetry spanning 14th to 16th century England, were the inspiration for A Ceremony of Carols, which includes both a Christmas narrative as well as references to the re-birth of spring.

Sanctus   from Missa Emmanuel    Richard Proulx

Fraction Anthem    Agnus Dei   from Missa Emmanuel    Richard Proulx

Communion Motet    In dulci jubilo (1837)    Robert Pearsall (1795-1856)
Words: Heinrich Seuse, c. 1328, translated Pearsall

In dulci jubilo, (In sweet rejoicing,)
Let us our homage show!
Our heart’s joy reclineth
In praesepio; (in the manger;)
And like a bright star shineth
Matris in gremio. (in the mother’s lap.)
Alpha es et O! (You are the Alpha and Omega!)

O Jesu parvule, (O tiny Jesus)
I yearn for thee alway!
Hear me, I beseech thee,
O puer optime; (O best of children)
My prayer let it reach thee,
O princeps gloriae. (O prince of glory)
Trahe me post te. (Make me follow you)

O patris caritas! (O love of the Father)
O Nati lenitas! (O gentleness of the Son)
Deeply were we stained.
Per nostra crimina: (through our crimes)
But thou hast for us gained
Coelorum gaudia, (the joys of heaven)
O that we were there!

Ubi sunt gaudia, (where are joys)
Where, if that they be not there?
There are angels singing
Nova cantica; (new songs)
There the bells are ringing
In Regis curia (in the courts of the King).
O that we were there!

In dulci jubilo (“In sweet rejoicing”) is a traditional Christmas carol. Translations into English, such as J.M. Neale’s arrangement “Good Christian Men, Rejoice” have increased its popularity, and Robert Pearsall’s 1837 macaronic translation is a mainstay of the Christmas Nine Lessons and Carols repertoire. (Macaronic: alternating between two languages, often showing odd contrasts.)

Closing Hymn in Procession 72    Hark! the glad sound! the Savior comes    Richmond

Voluntary     Praeludium: From heaven above to earth I come     Johann Pachelbel

Cantor: John Nowacki
Assisting Pianist: Jacqueline Smith

Tuesday, December 5, 2017, 6:00 p.m. + Stop, Rest Pray: A Time for Advent Reflection and Meditation

Join us for a half-hour service of prayer, scripture, reflection, silence, and chant.

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December 3, 2017 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

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The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation

 

December 3, 2017 + The First Sunday of Advent

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs; sermon by The Rev’d Helen M. Moore.

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary     Savior of the nations, come    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Prelude on Veni Emmanuel     Pietro Yon (1886-1943)

Processional Hymn 56, vv. 1, 2, 6, 7, 8    O come, O come, Emmanuel    Veni, veni Emmanuel

Kyrie Eleison   from Litany of the Saints    adapt. Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Sequence Hymn 324    Let all mortal flesh keep silence    Picardy

Offertory Anthem    I wonder as I wander    Carl Rütti, 2001
Words: John Jacob Niles (1892-1980)

I wonder as I wander out under the sky
How Jesus the Saviour did come for to die
For poor on’ry people like you and like I;
I wonder as I wander out under the sky

When Mary birthed Jesus ’twas in a cow’s stall
With wise men and farmers and shepherds and all
But high from God’s heaven, a star’s light did fall
And the promise of ages it then did recall.

If Jesus had wanted for any wee thing
A star in the sky or a bird on the wing
Or all of God’s Angels in heaven to sing
He surely could have it, ’cause he was the King

The text and more familiar tune of “I wonder” was collected by John Jacob Niles in Murphy, NC in July 1933 from a young traveling evangelist Annie Morgan. According to Niles, he asked her to sing the song repeatedly until he had memorized it. It was published in his 1934 Songs of the Hill-Folk. Written in a minor key, it’s qualities of pensiveness make it one of today’s most popular carols. This contemporary arrangement by Swiss composer Carl Rütti was first performed at Lessons and Carols at King’s College, Cambridge, in 2002. 

Sanctus   from Missa Emmanuel    Richard Proulx

Fraction Anthem    Agnus Dei   from Missa Emmanuel    Richard Proulx

Communion Anthem     My Lord is come    Will Todd, 2010
Words by the composer

Shepherds, called by angels, called by love and angels:
No place for them but a stable.
My Lord has come.
Sages, searching for stars, searching for love in heaven;
No place for them but a stable.
My Lord has come.
His love will hold me, his love will cherish me, love will cradle me.
Lead me, lead me to see him, sages and shepherds and angels;
No place for me but a stable.
My Lord has come.

Post-communion Anthem    He owns the cattle on a thousand hills     John W. Peterson, 1948
Words from from Psalm 50:10
Sung by the Church School

For every beast of the forest is mine, and the cattle upon a thousand hills.

Closing Hymn in Procession 57    Lo! He comes, with clouds descending    Helmsley

Voluntary    Toccata from Symphony No. 5    Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)

The “Widor Toccata” is arguably the second-famous of all organ works (just behind the Bach Toccata and Fugue in D minor). The first of the great French toccatas to take literally the title (meaning “touch”), it is a whirlwind of chords and arpeggios with a pedal melody that travels through many keys. And, it is pure joy!

Cantor: John Nowacki
Church School Songleader: Heidi Tummescheit

November 26, 2017 + The Last Sunday after Pentecost – Christ the King

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir; sermon by Hugh Bryant.

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Organ Voluntary   Partita on Diademata    Charles Callahan, 1991

Processional Hymn 494    Crown him with many crowns    Diademata

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm 95:1-7   Hymnal S3   Venite, exultemus

Sequence Hymn 614    Christ is the Kng!    Christus Rex

Offertory Anthem   Jubilate Deo   Richard Purvis, 1943
Words: Psalm 100

Oh be joyful, joyful in the Lord, all ye Lands,
Serve the Lord with gladness
And come before His presence with a song,
Be ye sure that the Lord He is God,
it is He that hath made us an not we ourselves
We are His people and the sheep of His pasture,
Oh go your way into His gates with thanksgiving
and into His courts with praise
Be thankful, thankful unto Him,
and speak good of His name.
For the Lord is gracious
His mercy is everlasting
And His truth endureth
from generation to generation
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
and to the Holy Ghost
As it was in the beginning
is now and ever shall be,
world without end. Amen.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    O taste and see    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
Words from Psalm 34
Emma Evica, soprano soloist

O taste and see how gracious the Lord is. Blessed is the man that trusteth in him!

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958) is regarded as the greatest English composer since Purcell (who died in 1695—a long time in between “greats”). His compositions span the entire breadth of styles and genres, from symphonies and oratorios to folksong collections. He served as editor of the 1906 English Hymnal, with Percy Dearmer. The spirit of the Sussex folksongs he knew and loved permeates the music of the brief motet, “O Taste and See,” which has become a perennial favorite.

Post-communion Anthem    Great is thy faithfulness    William Runyan (1870-1957)
Words: Thomas Chisholm  (1866-1960)
Cleveland Williams, soloist

“Great is Thy faithfulness,” O God my Father,
There is no shadow of turning with Thee;
Thou changest not, Thy compassions, they fail not
As Thou hast been Thou forever wilt be.

Summer and winter, and springtime and harvest,
Sun, moon and stars in their courses above,
Join with all nature in manifold witness
To Thy great faithfulness, mercy and love.

“Great is Thy faithfulness!” “Great is Thy faithfulness!”
Morning by morning new mercies I see;
All I have needed Thy hand hath provided—
“Great is Thy faithfulness,” Lord, unto me!

Closing Hymn in Procession 544    Jesus shall reign where’er the sun    Duke Street

Voluntary   Toccata    Flor Peeters (1903-1986)

Belgian organist and composer Flor Peeters was perhaps one of the most prominent composers of organ music during the twentieth century. He was close friends with fellow organist and composer, Charles Tournemire and received Cesar Franck’s organ console from Saint Clotilde upon his death. When the Germans attacked both Belgium and the Netherlands in 1940, Peeters, though his passport had been revoked due to his refusal to perform for the Germans, continued to travel across the border to teach at Tilburg and surreptitiously deliver secret messages. (Notes courtesy Emily Solomon)

 

November 23, 2017 + Thanksgiving Day

Holy Eucharist at 10:00 a.m. with hymns; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

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Voluntary   Aria from Twelfth Concerto     George Frederick Handel (1685-1759)

Opening Hymn 397   Now thank we all our God   Nun danket

Sequence Hymn 433   We gather together   Kremser

Music at the Offertory    Great is thy faithfulness   William Runyan (1870-1957)
         Cleveland Williams, soloist

Closing Hymn 290   Come ye thankful people   St. George’s, Windsor

Voluntary   Nun Danket Alle Gott    Sigfrid Karg-Elert (1877-1933)

 

November 19, 2017 + The Twenty-fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs; sermon by The Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary   Variations on St. Anne    Christa Rakich, 2011

Processional Hymn 680    O God, our help in ages past    St. Anne

Song of Praise     This land is your land     Woody Guthrie, 1940
The St. John’s Youth Orchestra

Sequence Hymn   For the fruit of all creation     Ar hyd y nos

Offertory Anthem    I will sing with the spirit    David Goodenough, 2006
Words: 1 Corinthians 14: 15; Psalm 96: 1

This piece is a setting of the Royal School of Church Music motto, I will sing with the spirit and also with the understanding, paired with Psalm 96:1: O sing unto the Lord a new song; sing unto the Lord all the earth.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Motet     Locus iste    Paul Mealor, 2009
Words: Latin gradual for the dedication of a church
Elizabeth Proteau, soloist

Locus iste a Deo factus est, inaestimabile sacramentum, irreprehensibilis est.
This place was made by God, a priceless sacrament; it is without reproach.

Paul Mealor has been described as “the most important composer to have emerged in Welsh choral music since William Mathias” (New York Times, 2001) and his music is “marked by something outside of himself that is beautifully spatial and evocative of landscape… it illuminates both our past and our future” (The Guardian, 2011). Gaining international prominence after his setting of Ubi caritas was premiered at the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, Paul Mealor has written some of the most beautiful and challenging choral music in the repertoire.

Closing Hymn in Procession 290    Come, ye thankful people, come    St. George’s, Windsor

Voluntary    Toccata in F    Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

 

November 12, 2017 + The 23rd Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir; sermon by the Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler.

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary   Offertorio in G    George Frederick Handel (1685-1759)
Prelude on Cwm Rhondda     Julia Calkins, 2002

Processional Hymn 53    Once he came in blessing    Gottes Sohn ist kommen

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 620    Jerusalem, my happy home    Land of Rest

Offertory Anthem   Swing low, sweet chariot     Spiritual, arr. Alice Parker (b. 1925)

Swing low, sweet chariot
Coming for to carry me home
Swing low, sweet chariot
Coming for to carry me home

I looked over Jordan, and what did I see
A band of angels coming after me
Sometimes I’m up, sometimes I’m down
Sometimes I’m almost to the ground

Alice Parker is a national treasure: America’s reigning queen of choral music. – American Record Guide
My twenty-years’ experience with Robert Shaw, an immersion in folk music of many kinds, has had a profound effect on my own understanding of song. I learned to see each tune as a small universe, setting up its own rules of pitch and rhythm, mood and dance. If I understand that universe, and work within it for my setting, the result is an organic whole that allows the original melody to flourish. – Alice Parker

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Motet    Oculi omnium    Charles Wood (1866-1926)
Words: Psalm 144:15

Oculi omnium in te spirant Domine:                The eyes of all wait upon thee, O Lord:
Et tu das illis escam in tempore opportune        And thou givest them their meat in due season.
Gloria tibi Domine. Amen.                 Glory be to thee, O Lord. Amen.

Closing Hymn in Procession 690    Guide me, O thou great Jehovah    Cwm Rhondda

Voluntary   Praeludium in G, BWV 550    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

This Prelude was probably written during the latter part of Bach’s tenure in Arnstadt (1703-1707), where he served as organist at the Neue Kirche. Thus, it is an early work and while it may not be a major achievement, it still exhibits the composer’s craftsmanship in contrapuntal writing and structure. The piece opens with a joyous, lively theme that centers largely on a four-note pattern that is often mirrored in the harmonies of the left hand, and a rigorous pedal solo. The counterpoint that follows works up a quite glorious and triumphant sense. – Robert Cummings

 

November 5, 2017 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation

 

November 5, 2017 + All Saints Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs; sermon by Erin Flinn.

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary    Prelude on Grand Isle    Charles Callahan, 2016
Pie Jesu from Requiem    Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)   Nancy Skele, flute

Fauré writes about his own work, perhaps the best-known choral requiem: “It has been said that my Requiem does not express the fear of death and someone has called it a lullaby of death. But it is thus that I see death: as a happy deliverance, an aspiration towards happiness above, rather than as a painful experience. The music of Gounod has been criticized for its overinclination towards human tenderness. But his nature predisposed him to feel this way: religious emotion took this form inside him. Is it not necessary to accept the artist’s nature? As to my Requiem, perhaps I have also instinctively sought to escape from what is thought right and proper, after all the years of accompanying burial services on the organ! I know it all by heart. I wanted to write something different.”

Processional Hymn 287    For all the saints, who from their labors rest    Sine Nomine

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 253    Give us the wings of faith to rise    San Rocco

Offertory Anthem    The Beatitudes    Bob Chilcott, 2006
Words: Matthew 5:3-11

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.
Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.
Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.
Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Bob Chilcott has been involved with choral music all his life, first as a Chorister and then a Choral Scholar at King’s College, Cambridge. Later, he sang and composed music for 12 years with the King’s Singers. His experiences with that group, his passionate commitment to young and amateur choirs, and his profound belief that music can unite people, have inspired him both to compose full-time and, through proactive workshopping, to promote choral music worldwide.This beautiful setting of the Beatitudes from Matthew’s gospel exemplifies the composer’s skill and versatility in writing for mixed voices. He leads the choir smoothly through a range of keys and moods, from the gentle simplicity of the opening “Bless’d are the poor in spirit’ to the more dramatic and colourful ‘Bless’d are ye, when men shall revile you”.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Agnus Dei from Requiem    Gabriel Fauré

Closing Hymn in Procession 293   I sing a song of the saints of God    Grand Isle

Voluntary    We all believe in one God    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Assisting Organist: David Chrzanowski

 

October 29, 2017 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the Trebles of the St. John’s Choir

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October 29, 2017 + The Twenty-first Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth & Adult Choirs; sermon by the Very Rev’d Andrew McGowan.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary   Schmücke dich, O liebe Seele, BWV 654    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Adorn thyself, O my soul, with gladness

Processional Hymn 397    Now thank we all our God    Nun danket alle Gott

Anthem   What a friend we have in Jesus    Harold M. Best, 1985
Words: Joseph Scriven (1819-1866), found at hymn 109.

“That looks like a sober man, I think I’ll hire him to cut wood for me.” That was said of a man on the streets of Lake Rice, Canada, as he walked along carrying a wood saw and a sawhorse. The response from a man nearby was, “That’s Joseph Scriven. He wouldn’t cut wood for you because you can afford to hire him. He only cuts wood for those who don’t have money enough to pay.” That seemed to be the philosophy and attitude of Scriven, a devoted member of the Plymouth Brethren Church. He had a sincere desire to help those who were truly destitute. On an occasion when Joseph became ill, a friend who was visiting with him discovered a poem near his bed and asked who had written it. Scriven said, “The Lord and I did it between us.” He had not intended that anyone else should see it. That poem went on to become one of the best-known hymns of all time.

Psalm 1    Chanted by the choir. Anglican Chant by Alec Wyton (1921-2007)

Sequence Hymn     Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine    Blessed Assurance

Offertory Hymn 705    As those of old their first fruits brought    Forest Green

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    A grateful heart    Mary Plumstead, 1977
Sung by the Youth Choir        Words: George Herbert (1593-1632)

Thou that hast given so much to me,
Give one thing more, a grateful heart.
Not thankful when it pleaseth me,
As if thy blessings had spare days:
But such a heart, whose pulse may be Thy praise.
Thou that hast given so much to me,
Give one thing more, a grateful heart.

Closing Hymn in Procession 539    O Zion, haste, thy mission high fulfilling    Tidings

Voluntary   Now thank we all our God    J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
Arranged for organ by Virgil Fox (1912-1980)

 

October 22, 2017 + The Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary   Prélude sur le nom d’Alain    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

This work was written in homage to Duruflé’s colleague Jehan Alain, who died in 1940 at the beginning of the Second World War. The Prélude comprises two themes; the first is derived from the name “Alain” by a continuation of the musical alphabet past H (German B) in octave rows so that “Alain” gives the notes A-D-A-A-F (also used in the double-fugue in today’s closing voluntary), and the second is a theme taken from Alain’s most famous organ work, Litanies. Duruflé was a highly self-critical composer whose musical language can be viewed as a synthesis of two schools: the impressionist tradition of Debussy and Ravel and the modal, Gregorian-inspired style of Gabriel Fauré. This particular work is soul-stirring and well-beloved because of its perfect balance and proportion – much like a painting by Monet.

Introit     Total Praise    Richard Smallwood, 1996
Sung by the men of the choir.

Lord, I will lift mine eyes to the hills
Knowing my help is coming from You
Your peace you give me in time of the storm

You are the source of my strength
You are the strength of my life
I lift my hands in total praise to you    Amen.

Processional Hymn 477    All praise to thee, for thou, O King divine    Engelberg

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 684    O for a closer walk with God    Caithness

Offertory Anthem    Treasures in heaven    Joseph Clokey (1890-1960)
Text: Matthew 6:19-21, 7:7-8

Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal: but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you: for every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    To everything there is a season    Alfred Fedak, 1988
Words: Ecclesiastes 3:1-8

To everything there is a season,
and a time to every purpose under heaven:
a time to be born and a time to die;
a time to plant and time to uproot;
a time to kill and time to heal;
a time to break down and time to build up;
to everything there is a season,
and a time to every purpose under heaven,
a time to weep and a time to laugh;
a time to mourn and time to dance;
a time to scatter stones and a time to gather stones together,
a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,
to everything there is a season,
a time to seek and time to lose;
a time to keep and time to cast away;
a time to rend and time to sew;
a time to keep silent and time to speak;
a time of love and a time of hate;
a time for war and a time for peace.
To everything there is a season.

It is difficult to hear this comforting text from Ecclesiates without calling to mind the popular 60’s song, Turn, turn, turn. Seeing a far greater need to inspire the hearing of these powerful words, Albany, New York composer Al Fedak has crafted a melody that allows the choir to communicate the deep meaning of the text clearly and with great feeling.

Closing Hymn in Procession 665    All my hope on God is founded    Michael

Voluntary    Fugue sur le nom d’Alain    Maurice Duruflé

 

October 15, 2017 + The Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs; sermon by the Rev’d Canon Chuck Robertson.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary   Concerto in A minor (after Vivaldi)    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Allegro – Adagio

Processional Hymn 556    Rejoice, ye pure in heart    Marion

Anthem, sung by the Youth Choir    Deep river    Allan Bevan, 1998
Words and Melody: African-American Spiritual

Deep River,
My home is over Jordan.
Deep river, Lord,
I want to cross over into campground.

Oh, don’t you want to go,
To the Gospel feast;
That Promised Land,
Where all is peace?

Sequence Hymn 321    My God, thy table now is spread    Rockingham

Offertory Anthem    Rejoice in the Lord alway     Anonymous, mid-sixteenth century
Words from today’s Epistle lesson

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Rise up, my love    Healey Willan (1880-1968)
Words: Song of Solomon

Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away.
For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone.
The flowers appear upon the earth.
The time of singing of birds is come.
Arise my love, my fair one, and come away.

Healey Willan was a prolific British composer and organist, spending most of his career in Canada. He has over 800 works in all genres to his credit, including many in our Hymnal 1982. Rise up my love dates from 1929. Willan was devoted to the Gregorian tradition, as can be heard in this simple but beautiful piece.

Closing Hymn in Procession    Great is thy faithfulness    Faithfulness

Thomas Chisholm wrote this hymn as a testament to God’s faithfulness through his very ordinary life.  Born in a log cabin in Franklin, Kentucky, Chisholm became a Christian when he was twenty-seven and entered the ministry when he was thirty-six, though poor health forced him to retire after just one year and work as an insurance agent. Still, even with a desk job, he wrote nearly 1,200 poems throughout his life, including several published hymns. Chisholm explained toward the end of his life, “My income has not been large at any time due to impaired health.  Although I must not fail to record here the unfailing faithfulness of a covenant-keeping God and that He has given me many wonderful displays of His providing care, for which I am filled with astonishing gratefulness.”

Voluntary    Trumpet Tune in D    David N. Johnson (1922-1981)

 

October 8, 2017 + The Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir; sermon by the Rev’d Bill Eakins.

Guest Organist/Choirmaster: Douglas Johnson

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary     Miniatures 8 & 10, from op. 55     Flor Peeters (1903-1986)

Processional Hymn 546    Awake my soul, stretch every nerve    Siroë

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn LEVAS 165    I am pressing on the upward way     Higher Ground

Offertory Anthem    Oculi omnium    Charles Wood (1866-1926)
Words: Psalm 144:15

Oculi omnium in te spirant Domine:                The eyes of all wait upon thee, O Lord:
Et tu das illis escam in tempore opportune        And thou givest them their meat in due season.
Gloria tibi Domine. Amen.                 Glory be to thee, O Lord. Amen.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Motet    Ave verum corpus    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

In the last few months of his life, Mozart was involved in the composition of the Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito. These two very different works were to dominate his last year until embarking upon the unfinished Requiem. On June 17 of 1791, his last year, Mozart took a break to compose the profound and heavenly Ave verum corpus for chorus and strings. This amazing little work is in his most ethereal last manner. Hushed, never going above the softest dynamics, it gives us a picture of an otherworldly peace unlike almost no other work. (Notes courtesy Craig Smith)

Closing Hymn in Procession 525    The church’s one foundation    Aurelia

Voluntary     Chorale: Gelobt sei Gott im hoechsten Thron     Ernst Pepping (1901-1981)

 

October 1, 2017 + Celtic Contemplative Service

Celtic Contemplative Worship at 4:30 p.m., beginning with silent meditation.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin

The new monthly Celtic service, a joint endeavor of St. John’s and St. James’s, centers on contemplation, connections to the earth, and healing and transformation through meditation and prayer. The service, featuring brief readings and reflections, beautiful music from a variety of traditions, and prayers, will be the first Sunday of the month, October through June, at St. John’s. The service begins at 4:30 with a period of silence for reflection and preparation

 

October 1, 2017 + The Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. with the blessing of the animals, sung by the Adult Choir; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Guest Musicians:
David Poirier, saxophone
Ray Palagy, percussion
David Chrzanowski, assisting organist

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary   Dance Prelude on Lasst uns erfreuen    David Schack, 1971

Processional Hymn 405    All things bright and beautiful    Royal Oak

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 711    Seek ye first the kingdom of God    Seek Ye First

Hymn at the Blessing of the Animals 400    All creatures of our God and King    Lasst uns erfreuen

Offertory Anthem    Canticle of Brother Sun and Sister Moon (from Missa Gaia/Earth Mass)    Paul Winter/Jim Scott, 1982

The Earth Mass was one of the first contributions made by Paul Winter when he and his Paul Winter Consort became the artists in residence at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City. The mass includes the usual text, such as the Kyrie and the Agnus Dei, and also other text, hymns, and instrumental pieces. The mass is an environmental liturgy of contemporary music. Since it was first written, the mass is performed annually at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine at The Feast of St. Francis which is the blessing of the animals.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Song    Eat this bread, drink this cup    Taizé Chant

Closing Hymn in Procession 412    Earth and all stars    Earth and All Stars

Voluntary    Carillon    Scott Lamlein, 2010

 

September 24, 2017 + Choral Evensong

Choral Evensong at 5:00 p.m. sung by the Adult Choir

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September 24, 2017 + The Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs; sermon by the Rev’d Helen Moore.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Organ Voluntary    Trumpet Voluntary     Henry Heron (1727-1789)
Prelude au Kyrie      Jean Langlais (1907-1991)

Processional Hymn 410    Praise, my soul, the King of heaven    Lauda anima

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm 145:1-8    Chanted by the Choir, Anglican chant by Thomas Norris (1741-1790)

Sequence Hymn   We all are one in mission    Nyland

Offertory Anthem    You are my God    Bob Chilcott (b. 1955)

Bob Chilcott, described by The Observer as “a contemporary hero of British Choral Music,” has become one of the most widely performed composers of choral music in the world. His You are my God is indicative of his style: melodic and singable, yet with a new and fresh twist.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Motet    Locus iste    Anton Bruckner (1824-1896)
Words: Latin gradual for the dedication of a church

Locus iste a Deo factus est, inaestimabile sacramentum, irreprehensibilis est.
This place was made by God, a priceless sacrament; it is without reproach.

Although mostly known for his nine symphonies, Anton Bruckner’s compositional output includes sacred masterworks as well. Bruckner assiduously studied the music of Renaissance Italian polyphonic masters such as Palestrina and German Baroque composers, especially Bach. Locus iste was written in 1869, to celebrate the dedication of the votive chapel of the cathedral at Linz, where Bruckner had been the cathedral organist. (Notes courtesy Ryan Turner)

Closing Hymn in Procession 541    Come, labor on    Ora Labora

Voluntary    The Emporer’s Fanfare    Antonio Soler (1729-1783)

 

September 17, 2017 + The Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. on the West Lawn with music by the Hartford Steel Symphony; sermon by the Rev’d William Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text

Service Music:

Voluntary   The Hartford Steel Symphony

Opening Song    Heleluyan    Creek Indian Chant

Offertory Music     The Hartford Steel Symphony

Communion Music    Bless the Lord, my soul     Taizé Chant

Closing Song     Amen    Iona Chant

Voluntary  The Hartford Steel Symphony

 

September 10, 2017 + The Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Youth and Adult Choirs; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary   Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Meditation on Peace like a river     Sondra Tucker, 2006

While the Voluntary is instantly recognized as “phantom of the opera” spooky music, this stereotyped association tends to obscure the brilliance of the composition. Long before it was used in films, video games and ringtones, it was transcribed and arranged for orchestra, band, piano, brass and other instruments (even marimba!). A theory exists that it may have been an arrangement by Bach of a lost violin piece; since the 1980s, scholars have been debating whether it is even by Bach at all. Various stylistic departures from the rest of Bach’s output are generally explained by it being an early work, based on the improvisatory forms of North German composers much studied and admired by Bach. Even if the music is by one of his predecessors, a listener can in any case imagine a teenage Bach pulling out all the stops and having fun with the massive chords, virtuosic use of the pedals, echo effects and startling dissonance.

Processional Hymn 518    Christ is made the sure foundation    Westminster Abbey

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn 581    Where charity and love prevail    Cheshire

Offertory Anthem    The Spirit of the Lord    Philip Stopford (b. 1977)
Words from Isaiah 61

The spirit of the Lord is upon me,
Because he hath anointed me to preach the Gospel to the poor.
He hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives
And recovering of sight to the blind, To preach the acceptable year of the Lord,
To give unto them that mourn a garland of ashes, the oil of joy for mourning,
The garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness,
That they might be called trees of righteousness,
The planting of the Lord that he might be glorified.
For as the earth bringeth forth her bud,
And as the garden causeth the things that are sown in it to spring forth,
So the Lord God will cause righteousness and praise to spring forth before the nations.

Philip Stopford is a contemporary English composer who began his career as a youth chorister at Westminster Abbey, singing under Simon Preston and Martin Neary. His music is equally popular with American choirs as it is with English ones, due to his accessible yet thought-provoking compositional style. Our Youth Choir (along with the choir of St. James’s Church) will be premiering a new work by Philip at the Albert Schweitzer Organ Festival in October.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Bread of the world, in mercy broken     John Abdenour (b. 1962)
Words: Reginald Heber (1783-1826), found at Hymn 301

Closing Hymn   Shall we gather at the river    At the River

Voluntary    Toccata Brevis    Daniel Gawthrop, 1985

 

September 3, 2017 + The Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with Hymns; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Adagio from Sonata I    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Opening Hymn 435 1-4    At the name of Jesus King’s    Weston

Sequence Hymn 707    Take my life, and let it be consecrated    Hollingsdale

Offertory Music   Dance-Prelude on Cwm Rhondda     Paul Manz (1919-2009)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn 594    God of grace and God of glory    Cwm Rhondda

Voluntary   Allegro maestoso e vivace from Sonata II    Felix Mendelssohn

 

August 27, 2017 + The Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers; sermon by the Rev’d William Eakins.

Worship at Home:

Click here for: Service Bulletin – Sermon Text for 9 a.m. (Bill Eakins) – Sermon Text for 5 p.m. (Hope Eakins)

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Service Music:

Voluntary   Prelude on Land of Rest    George Shearing (1919-2011)

Opening Hymn 522    Glorious things of thee are spoken    Austria

Sequence Hymn    It is well with my soul    Ville du Havre

Offertory Music    I am the bread of life     Jack Warren Burnam (b. 1946)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn 379    God is love, let heaven adore him    Abbot’s Leigh

Voluntary    Psalm 19    Benedetto Marcello (1686-1739)

 

August 20, 2017 + The Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers; sermon by the Rev’d Walter McKenney.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary   Prelude on Beecher    Scott Lamlein, 2012

Opening Hymn 371    Thou, whose almighty word    Moscow

Sequence Hymn 470    There’s a wideness in God’s mercy    Beecher

Offertory Music    O Christ, the healer, we have come    Southern Harmony, 1835

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn    Great is thy faithfulness    Faithfulness

Voluntary    Jerusalem    Charles Hubert Hastings Parry

 

August 13, 2017 + The Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers; sermon by the Rev’d Helen Moore.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary   Pastorale on Forest Green    Richard Purvis (1917-1992)

Opening Hymn 398    I sing the mighty pow’r of God    Forest Green

Sequence Hymn 608    Eternal Father, strong to save    Melita

Offertory Music   Precious Lord, take my hand    Thomas Dorsey (1899-1993)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn 699    Jesus, lover of my soul    Aberystwyth

Voluntary   Prelude in E minor, BWV 533    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

 

August 6, 2017 + The Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. sung by the Summer Singers; sermon by Michael Corey.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary   Prelude in D    Johann K. F. Fischer (1665-1746)

Opening Hymn 7    Christ, whose glory fills the skies    Ratisbon

Sequence Hymn 383    Fairest Lord Jesus    St. Elizabeth

Offertory Music   Jesu, joy of man’s desiring   Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn 594    God of grace and God of glory    Cwm Rhondda

Voluntary   Short Prelude and Fugue in G, BWV 557    Johann Sebastian Bach

 

July 30, 2017 + The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with hymns; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Chorale: Es ist das Heil uns kommen her     Anonymous, 18th century

Opening Hymn 488    Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart    Slane

Sequence Hymn 635    If thou but trust in God to guide thee    Wer nur den lieben Gott

Offertory Music    Chorale and Variation: Wer nur den lieben Gott lässt walten     Georg Böhm (1661-1733)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn    I will trust in the Lord    Trust in the Lord

Voluntary    Allegro maestoso, op. 55 #7     Flor Peeters (1903-1986)

Guest Organist: Douglas Johnson

 

July 23, 2017 + The Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with hymns; sermon by the Rev’d Walter McKenney.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary  Aria from 12th Concerto   G.F. Handel (1685-1759)

Opening Hymn 365    Come, thou Almighty King    Moscow

Sequence Hymn 302    Father, we thank thee who hast planted    Rendez a Dieu

Offertory Music   Air from Water Music    G.F. Handel (1685-1759)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn 344    Lord dismiss us with thy blessing    Sicilian Mariners

Voluntary    The Prince of Denmark’s March   Jeremiah Clarke (1604-1707)

 

July 16, 2017 + The Sixth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with hymns; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary   Canzona on Liebster Jesu    Richard Purvis (1917-1992)

Opening Hymn 48    O day of radiant gladness    Es flog ens kleins Waldvogelein

Sequence Hymn 440    Blessed Jesus, at thy word    Liebster Jesu

Offertory Music Meditation on Liebster Jesu    George Thalben-Ball (1896-1987)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn   Shall we gather at the river    At the River

Voluntary   Grand Choeur on Austria    Richard Purvis

July 9, 2017 + The Fifth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with hymns; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Preludium in C    J. P. Sweelinck (1562-1621)

Opening Hymn 657    Love divine, all loves excelling    Hyfrydol

Sequence Hymn 693    Just as I am, without one plea    Woodworth (vs. 1-2)

Offertory Music    Adagio from Organ Sonata 1, op. 65    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn 693    Just as I am, without one plea    Woodworth (vs. 4-6)

Voluntary    Praeludium et Fuga ex D    Johann Krieger (1651-1735)

Guest Organist: Douglas Johnson

 

July 2, 2017 + The Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with hymns; sermon by the Rev’d Helen Moore.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Eighteenth Variation from Rapsodie on a Theme of Paganini     by Sergei Rachmaninoff, arr. James Kimball

Opening Hymn 718    God of our fathers, whose almighty hand    National Hymn

Sequence Hymn 655    O Jesus, I have promised    Nyland

Offertory Music     Variations on Finlandia     Jean Sibelius

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Closing Hymn 719    O beautiful for spacious skies    Materna

Voluntary    God Bless America     Irving Berlin

Guest Organist: Kyle Brazauski

 

June 25, 2017 + The Third Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with Margaret Beers, soloist; sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship Online:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Prelude on Leoni    Richard Proulx (b. 1937)

Opening Hymn 372    Praise to the living God    Leoni

Sequence Hymn 524    I love thy kingdom, Lord    St. Thomas (Williams)

Offertory Music    Bist du bei Mir (Be thou with me)     Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Communion Music    Panis angelicus    César Franck (1822-1890)

Panis angelicus
fit panis hominum;
Dat panis cœlicus
figuris terminum:
O res mirabilis!
Manducat Dominum
Pauper, servus et humilis.

Te trina Deitas
unaque poscimus:
Sic nos tu visita,
sicut te colimus;
Per tuas semitas
duc nos quo tendimus,
Ad lucem quam inhabitas.
Amen.

May the Bread of Angels
Become bread for mankind;
The Bread of Heaven puts
All foreshadowings to an end;
Oh, thing miraculous!
The body of the Lord will nourish
the poor, the servile, and the humble.

You God, Three
And One, we beseech;
That You visit us,
As we worship You.
By Your ways,
lead us where we are heading,
to the light that You inhabitest.
Amen.

Closing Hymn 564    He who would valiant be ‘gainst all disaster    St. Dunstan’s

Voluntary    Postlude in G    G. F. Handel (1685-1759)

 

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June 18, 2017 + The Second Sunday after Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 9:00 a.m. with Cleveland Williams, soloist; sermon by the Rev’d Stacey Kohl.

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Service Music:

Voluntary   Prelude on Rhosymedre    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

Opening Hymn 686    Come, thou font of every blessing    Nettleton

Sequence Hymn 321    My God, thy table now is spread    Rockingham

Offertory Music    The Lord is my light    Frances Allitsen (1848-1919)

Sanctus S125     Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

Communion Music    The Lord’s Prayer    Albert Hay Malotte (1895-1964)

Closing Hymn 587    Our Father, by whose name    Rhosymedre

Voluntary    Fugue in F, BWV 556     Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

 

Full Sermon Text:

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June 11, 2017 + Trinity Sunday

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Michael Corey.

Worship at Home:

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Carillon de Westminster    Louis Vierne (1870-1937)
Promenade on Nicaea    June Nixon (b. 1942)

Processional Hymn 362    Holy, holy holy! Lord God almighty!    Nicaea

In 325 AD, Church leaders convened in the town of Nicaea in Bithynia to formulate a consensus of belief and practice amongst Christians. What resulted was the Nicene Creed, a document passed on through the ages as one of the pillars of church doctrine. The primary function of this creed was to establish a firm belief in the Trinity, countering the heresy of Arius, who believed that Jesus was not fully divine. It was this creed that inspired Reginald Heber to write his great hymn, Holy, holy holy, with the intent that the hymn be sung on Trinity Sunday – eight weeks after Easter.

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Canticle S236    Glory to you   John Rutter (b. 1945)

Sequence Hymn 367    Round the Lord in glory    Rustington

Offertory Anthem    Christ is our cornerstone    Noel Rawsthorne (b. 1929)
Words: translated from the Latin by J. Chandler

Christ is our cornerstone, on him alone we build; with his true saints alone
The courts of heaven are filled; on his great love our hopes we place of present grace and joys above.

Here, gracious God, do thou forevermore draw nigh; accept each faithful vow,
And mark each suppliant sigh; in copious shower on all who pray, each holy day, thy blessings pour.

O then with hymns of praise these hallowed courts shall ring; our voices we will raise
The three in one to sing; and thus proclaim in joyful song both loud and long, that glorious name.

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    The Lord’s Prayer    John Tavener (1944-2013)

John Tavener was one of the leading British composers of recent history. His predominantly religious and contemplative music – called “holy minimalism” by some critics – has an unmistakable resonance. The repetition of musical phrases becomes its own spirit.

Closing Hymn 371    Thou, whose almighty word    Moscow

Voluntary    Prelude to Te Deum    Marc-Antoine Charpentier (1634-1704)

 

Full Sermon Text:

Sermon by Mike Corey, a postulant for ordination in the Episcopal Church in Connecticut and member of St. John’s.

June 4, 2017 + The Day of Pentecost

Holy Eucharist Rite II at 10:30 a.m. sung by the Adult Choir, sermon by the Rev’d Susan Pinkerton.

Worship at Home:

Click here for the Service Bulletin; scroll to read full sermon text.

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Service Music:

Voluntary    Choral varié sur le thème du Veni Creator    Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)
Theme. Allegro religioso – Variation 1. Poco meno mosso – Variation 2. Allegretto – Variation 3. Andante espressivo

Veni Creator Spiritus is believed to have been composed by Rabanus Maurus in the 9th century. An invocation of the Holy Spirit, it has been included in many musical arrangements, including Gustav Holst’s 8th Symphony, as well as in the Duruflé set of variations for organ that frame our worship this morning.

Processional Hymn 225    Hail thee, festival day    Salve festa dies

Gloria in excelsis S278     William Mathias (1934-1992)

Sequence Hymn   Spirit of gentleness   Spirit

James K. Manley was born in 1940 at Holyoke, Massachusetts, and received his education at Whittier College, Pacific School of Religion, and Claremont School of Theology, all in California. He was ordained to the ministry of the United Church of Christ in 1966. James K. Manley wrote the tune SPIRIT for his text of 1978, and it appeared in his collection After Eden (1990) with an arrangement by Jim Strathdee.

Offertory Anthem   Come, Holy Ghost    Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)
Words: Latin, 9th century, found at Hymn 503

Sanctus S128    William Mathias

Fraction Anthem S166  Agnus Dei     Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Communion Anthem    Veni Creator Spiritus     Gregorian Chant
Words: Latin, 9th century, translation found at Hymn 503
Sung by the men of the choir

Closing Hymn 516    Come down, O Love divine    Down Ampney

Voluntary    Choral varié sur le thème du Veni Creator    Maurice Duruflé
Variation 4 ‘Final’. Allegro

 

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